Forgotten Greens of Scotland
Forgotten Greens of Scotland

Wick Golf Club's Other Course

Wick Golf Club, 1870

 

John O’Groat Journal, September 8th 1870.

Golf.

 

A number of gentlemen held a meeting here last week for the purpose of considering the advisability of forming a golf club. After some conversation, a committee was appointed for carrying out the proposal.

 

John O’ Groat Journal June 1st 1871

 

The golf club has arranged to play a match on the usual ground on Thursday, 8th  June. The day recommended by the town council as a general holiday.

 

John O’ Groat Journal June 15th 1871.

Golf Match.

 

A golf match was played over the usual ground at the Society’s Park , East Banks, on Thursday last. Out of about twenty members nine only competed, and some of the number had but recently practiced. Six holes were cut round the park, and the golfers started from the corner near the Toll-House, at about 12 o’clock.

The game was energetically contested, and the playing fully up to any previous day’s scoring, although the grass was in the worst possible condition for such a game, being long and thick and perfectly white with gowans, which frequently caused both the players and their “ Caddies” to lose sight of the balls. The players went round the park four times in pairs, except the odd three, who went to-gether, with a break of half an hour after the two first rouns – the competitor with the fewest number of strokes after the four rounds winning a silver medal. ( For one year ) and a driver club : the player with the next fewest strokes receiving an oron cleek : the third a pair of golf balls : and the fourth one golf ball – four prizes in all.

As will be seen from the following list of scores, the fewest number of strokes taken in any one round was by Mr Smith, who in the fourth round scored 27, the lowest number done by any member since the club was formed in October last, except on one occasion, when Mr Jack and Dr Banks made a round with a similar total :-

 

                                                                                 1st       2nd      3rd      4th    Totals

 

  1. Dr Banks                                                      31       33      28       32 --   124
  2. Mr Jack                                                        34       35      32       28 ---  129
  3. Mr Smith                                                     32       39      32       27   --- 130
  4. Mr Muir                                                       35       33      33       30 ---- 131
  5. Mr Mackie                                                   34       34      33       32 ---- 133
  6. Mr Buik                                                       36       30      34       34 ---- 134
  7. Mr Reid Jnr.                                                 37      36      34       35 ----  142
  8. Mr Stobie                                                     37      38      35       35 ----- 145

John O’Groat Journal June 12th 1873.

 

The Wick golf club will play a grand match on Reiss Links on Saturday week, the 21st

current.

John O’ Groat Journal June 26th 1873.

Golf Match.

 

The members of the Wick golf club played their annual match on the links of Reiss on Saturday last. The weather was fine, and the links were spendidly adapted for play. The first couple to start off were Mr Buik and Mr Mackie who were followed successively by Dr Banks and Mr W. Reid, and Messrs Smith, Muir and Smitton. Four rounds were played, and at the end of the last round the scores of the winners of the four prizes stood as follows :-

 

Dr Banks ………………….. 152

Mr Mackie ………………… 158

Mr Smith ………………….. 160

Mr Buik )

Mr Muir ) A tie ……………. 161

 

The silver medal offered by the club as the first prize now becomes the property of Dr Banks, who has won it three times in succession. We understand that Sir George Dunbar has kindly given the club permission to play occasionally on the links – a priviledge which is greatly valued by the members, as better ground could not anywhere be got. The players drove out and home in a Wagonette, and thoroughly enjoyed the pleasure and excitement afforded by the game.

 

Northern Ensign, June 8th,1887

Wick Annual Holiday

 

The Golf Club At Dunnet

 

The Wick golf club played a match on Thursday at Dunnet Links, when fifteen players took part in the game. The following were the prize-men :- 1, Chas. Fletcher 95 ; 2, John Murray 96 ; 3, W.M. Crowe 96 ; 4, J. Harrison 102 ; 5, W. Dick 108 ; , Dr Alexander and J. Henderson each 109. The other scores ranged from 123 to 136, and for obvious reasons we forbear giving the names of the players and their respective scores. The ground was hard and dry, but the weather, from a golfers point of view, might appropriately be called Queens weather.

The golfers, on arrival at the links, found young Dunnet waiting in large numbers. No time was lost in each man engaging a caddy from amongst the youngsters. The game had not begun when the school board officer appeared on the scene, and gave an unexpected turn to the aspect of affairs. Most of the caddies were, metaphorically speaking, collared and bundled back to school. Unwillingly they went, and the golf club was left amused and lamenting. Soon afterwards another detachment, beyond school age, filled the breach, and the game proceeded.

That the officer did his duty no one was disposed to doubt, but it might be a fine point at law whether the golfers who engaged the scholars had not rendered themselves liable to a penalty.

After the match, a hearty dinner was partaken of at Mrs Spence’s. Thereafter the company broke up into parties, some of whom played a round or two at golf, and others visited the grand rock scenery of Dunnet Head and its vicinity before returning to Wick.

John O’Groat Journal February 10th 1891.

Golf.

 

Twelve golfers met on Reiss Links on Saturday, and went twice round the new course which was recently laid out. Mr Lobban, H.M. School Inspector, who started scratch, took the first place with a score of 98.

 

John O’Groat Journal June 9th 1891.

Annual Excursion of the Wick Golf Club.

 

Off To John O'Groat's

 

It has been the custom of the Wick golfers for a number of years to spend the annual holiday at John O’Groats. After their pleasant experiences of last year it was not to be expected that they would discontinue  what has now grown to be an annual custom. There are few visitors to this famous place that derive more enjoyment from their visit than the members of the Wick golf club. There are at John O’Groats splendid golf links that compare favourably with those at Musselburgh or even St Andrews. There are plenty of hazards, while the putting greens are smooth and even, and last, but not least of the attractions, there is the John O’Groats Hotel.

A start was made at golf at about 11am in fine golfing weather. About nine or ten couples paired off on the green, the rear being brought up by four enthusiastic juvenile golfers, who played the most enjoyable of all kind of golf, “ Foursome.” The course is rather shorter than the ordinary one, and so admitted of three full rounds being played before the dinner-adjournment.

Comparatively little interest was taken in the scoring. When the cards were handed in, that made by Dr Banks was the least, but this was considerably in advance of the record made by Mr A.K. Miller last year. About 3 p.m. the company went back to the hotel, where, through the exertions of one of our well-known local magnates, dinner was promptly served.

This over, an impromptu toast list, headed of course by the Loyal and Patriotic ones, was gone through. Amongst others that of the “ Wick Golf Club” deserves the most attention. The toast was coupled with the name of Mr Alex. Geddes, the youngest member. After it had been duly honoured with the usual three jerky cheers, Mr Geddes, with a bow, rose to reply. He said he considered himself well qualified to reply to that toast. ( Hear,Hear, Cheers and Laughter. ) He had much experience of bunkers that day – ( Laughter ) – and further he had broken a club – ( Renewed Laughter ) – and consequently he concluded he was fully initiated in the game. ( Great Laughter and Cheers ) Mr A.W. Henderson, Deputy-Lieutenant of the county, and Captain of the club, humorously replied to the toast of his health.

No more golf was played during the day, but instead, a game of cricket in the most approved and picturesque style was indulged in. Mr A.W. Henderson was captain of one side, while Mr Alex Geddes kept everybody alive to the fact that he was the “ Boss of This” the other, team.

Special instructions were given to the bowlers not to bowl swiftly. “ Sneakers” were strictly prohibited, and so slow lobs were the order of the day. A respected and venerable gentleman, whose sterling honesty could be depended upon in any emergency was chosen for the responsible office of scorer, but the duties of an umpire seemed to be but imperfectly known the various gentlemen who thought themselves qualified for the post ; indeed their decision were more amusing than correct. The scores were :- Mr Henderson’s side, 29 and 48 -77, Mr Geddes’s, 38 and 47 – 85, the latter side thus winning by 8 runs. Tumultuous was the cheering raised in honour of the “ Boss” of the winning team.

After the cricket was concluded, the players retired to the hotel for tea, before leaving for home, a highly complimentary entry was made in the visitors book, in which the golfers expressed themselves as immensely pleased with their day’s enjoyment.

John O’Groat Journal October 6th 1891.

Annual Meeting of Golf Club.

 

The annual business meeting of the Wick Golf Club was held on the evening of Friday last in Nicol’s Station Hotel. There was agood turnout of members, including representatives from Dornoch. Dr Banks occupied the chair. The secretary, Captain Jas.H. Henderson, read a statement of the past year’s proceedings by which it appeared that Mr Chas. Fletcher, M.A., carried off both prizes, one of which was presented by Captain A.W. Henderson, and has to be won three times before becoming the absolute property of the winner. The annual report of the treasuer showed the club in a more flourishing financial position than it has been for some years. A committee was appointed to approach Mr Alex Sinclair, Corn Merchant, with the object of securing liberty to extend the days when play can take place upon the links.

 

John O’ Groat Journal May 3rd 1892.

Golf.

 

Since the arrangement come to between the tenant of Reiss Links and the golf club whereby members can enjoy the game any day of the week, several new members have joined the club. The game is in high favour in the North.

 

John O’Groat Journal November 15th 1892.

Golf.

 

The golfers are turning out to play better now than they have done for some years. Nearly every Saturday sees a fair number going the rounds of Reiss Links.

 

John O’Groat Journal June 22nd 1894.

Wick.

 

The Wick golf club commenced a sweepstake tournament for holes on Saturday last, when eighteen members entered the lists. A.K. Miller beat G.A. Sinclair by 9 up. A. Rae tied with D. Nicolson, and won by having a lower handicap. A. Gordon beat Alex Bremner by 2 up. C. Fletcher beat R. Robertson by 18 up. J.H. Henderson beat J. Sutherland by 8 up and seven to play. Dr Banks beat A.W. Henderson by 2 up. W. Dick beat Mr Phillips by 9 up and 7 to play. W. Reis tied with T. Sinclair and won by having a lower handicap.J. Campbell beat J. Harrison by 7 up. The winners will continue the tournament next Saturday.

 

John O’ Groat Journal September 28th 1894.

Wick Golf Club.

 

It is now near a quarter of a century since the Wick Golf Club was started, and the players used then to meet for practice on that large field extending between Harrow Park and the South Rope Work, before any houses were erected thereon. A visit to the links at Reiss was then a rare occurrence, while now the members have become so enthusiastic that nothing less than a weekly meeting on the links will suffice, and in fact some of the players drive out twice in the week. On Saturday last there was a muster of 25 players, the largest since the club was instituted. Over twenty took part in what is termed a Colonel Bogey Match, while the others, including three ladies, had a quiet game on their own account.

The lady players were Miss Elder, a daughter of Dr Elder, Edinburgh, who was also present, Miss Parry, Shrewsbury, a niece of the Dr’s and Miss Macdonald, Thurso Place, who all showed considerable expertness in handling their clubs. Mr Symon Sutherland, who was also on a visit to the North, took part in the game. At the conclusion Mr Charles Fletcher took first place with the lowest score, being followed by Dr Banks, Dr Elder, and Mr Dick.

John O’Groat Journal June 28th 1895.

 

The Wick golfers make a pilgrimage to Reay and play

a friendly game with the Reay golfers.

 

 The village of Reay is a bashful little place. All around the coast of Great Britain there are villages with half the attractions of Reay advertising themselves unblushingly in newspapers and guidebooks as having the most invigorating climate and the finest golf course in the kingdom. “ The finest golf course in Scotland” is held out to be the happy possession of at least fifty seaside resorts, and they take every opportunity of letting the public know it. It is their business to advertise. But Reay has hitherto been bashfully pleased with it’s quiet dreamy existence on the links where Sandside Bay retires from the noise and never ceasing turmoil of the Pentland. Only when its poet has sung its praises are the people of Caithness, and friends in other lands reminded that there is such a place in existence. But,

 

The Attractions of Reay

 

Only require to be experienced to be appreciated. To be convince of the invigorating properties of it’s atmosphere it is only necessary to live a day or two in the place, and breathe the air that comes sweeping in from the Atlantic. It is not sharp and cold like the wind from the east, nor yet too soft or damp like the breezes from the west. It is just a combination of both, so admirably blended that almost any ailment except a bad conscienceis bound to succumb to it within three days or less. The atmosphere of Reay “ Touches the Spot.” There is no doctor required in the parish except for ailments brought on by the new sanitary schemes of the County Council and its officials, the people of Reay seldom died except by accident or old age. So much for the climate. Prominent among its other attractions is,

 

The Reay Golf Course

 

It is a splendid natural course, planned out in Twelve Holes by a professional who knew his business. The bunkers, burns, and other obstacles are not artificial. They were laid down at the creation in a way that marks out the place as one intended for the great game of golf, although only put to the use for which it was intended within the past few years. The Reay golf club is a young club. It owes its existence to the forethought of the shrewd and at the same time generous proprietor of Sandside, on which estate the village and golf course are situated. He came into the possession of the estate a few years ago, when there was a spirit of Landleaguism and general dissatisfaction all round.The people of Reay were considerable land leaguers then. They knew they wanted something, but they were not sure whether it was more land or smaller rents or government grants.

The proprietor took in the situation ata glance. He saw that what they wanted was golf, and he  immediately instituted,

 

The Reay Golf Club

 

There were some difficulties to contend with at first. The keen politicians of the place suspected some deep tory plot. The land leaguers saw at once an attempt to deprive them of their common pasture according to the custom of landlords who had gone before. But some of the younger generation took a notion to the game. Being active, athletic, and accustomed to outdoor exercise, skill in the game came naturally to them, and the golf fever soon spread. Golf became a popular institution, so much so that when the Liberal Government get a few “ More Land” clauses tacked on the crofters act an application for an extension of their golf-course may be expected from Reay. Or when the next Unionist Government have a few grants of public money to allocate over the Highlands the crofters and landless cottars of Reay may forward a petition for a share of the spoil to provide themselves with new golf clubs.

With their own taste for the game, and the generous encouragement of the proprietor, the Reay golfers very quickly had a club with a constitution and rules, and other accessories as complete as any in the kingdom, and perhaps even more exclusive. While the entrance money was fixed at the moderate sum of a shilling one of the rules provided that none but residenters in Reay could become members, so that the Prince of Wales, who might have the refusal of all the most aristocratic clubs in the world, could not become a member of the Reay club unless he got a croft in Reay. And crofts are very scarce in Reay.

 

A Few Other Attractions

 

Of this “ Sweet Auburn, loveliest Village of the Plain” may be casually mentioned before proceeding to relate the incident which last week brought the Reay golfers into local fame, as the champion exponents of the game in the county. There are girls in Reay. The poet has sung of them, and that they are fair is beyond question. That they should be here mentioned as if only secondary attractions is also due to the all-absorbing influence of golf. The day was, and not long ago, when the Reay young men agreed with the poet about “ the greatest bliss that the tongue of man can name.” Now it is a grievance among the maids of Reay that their young men only come to see them when it is too dark to play golf. But the enterprising pilgrim to Reay will still find themas fair and agreeable as the poet has said.

And to he who would spend a brief holiday far from the madding crowd, what more perfect day’s enjoyment than to wander over the breezy links all day, and in the cool of the evening sample the tea and the harmony of some fair Reay maid. And there is genius in Reay. Its poetic genius is known far and wide. And equal in merit in his own line is the village blacksmith, scientist, historian, and philosopher. His genius, quiet and retiring, will be known when his biography is written. It is believed that if he left philosophy and history and turned his attention to the manufacture of cleeks and niblicks, his genius would be found sufficient to achieve success. There is already in Reay, a joiner who can make a wooden club that will play – and play well. When the amount of bad clubs and blasphemy that enter into the great game of golf are taken into account should not a laurel wreath  be awarded to the man who can make a wooden club that will calm the troubled spirit of the golfer and promote peace and good will among men ? With all those advantages, and the additional one of a model village inn wherein to dwell it may appear remarkable that Reay has existed so long without being discovered. But, as already stated, the village of Reay is a bashful little place.

 

An excursion to Reay

 

Was planned by the Wick golf club, and carried out last Saturday. The Wick club is of old standing, numbering in its ranks veterans who have dared the dangers of the deepest bunkers for years. They had heard with pleasure of the aspirations of the young players of Reay. They had even heard the names of Morrison and Manson as foemen worthy of their steel, and like all true and valiant knights the Wick players were moved with a generous desire to encourage their younger brethren in arms to higher aspirations. A friendly match being arranged, they proceeded by train to Thurso, and thence per Mrs Cook’s express to Reay, where they received a hearty welcome from the home players. To the links both teams at once proceeded, and opened with a preliminary foursome to show the strangers the lie of the green, followed by a match of two rounds. Generally speaking, the result of the day’s play was a corroboration of the poet burns, when he said “ Man was made to mourn, if he has not got a knowledge of the Gaelic.” A knowledge of the Gaelic still lingers in Reay ans is used in playing golf. In the preliminary foursome the Wick players were charmed with the simplicity of their opponents play, and conscious of their own superiority gave them all the valuable hints they knew on golf. Then the match came on, and the marked improvement of the Reay play at once proved the advantages of the Gaelic.

When the match concluded the advantage appeared to be all with the youthful knights of Reay. It is unnecessary to give descriptive details of the play.

 

The Scores

 

Herewith appended will show how the honoursof the game went :-

 

Reay.                  Holes                           Wick                       Holes

 

  1. Morrison ……………..  2                             Dr Banks ……………… 0

A.S. Manson …………….  3                              C. Fletcher ……………. 0

D. Murray ……………….. 0                              A. Gordon …………….  5

R. Mackay ………………  0                              John McNicol ………… 3

W. McDonald …………… 3                              D.W. Georgeon ………..0

J.W. McLoed ……………. 0                              G.F. Mackenzie ……….  3

G. Mackay ………………. 2                              J. Campbell ……………. 0

A. Grant …………………  4                              W. Dick ……………….. 0

D.S. Sim ………………… 2                               T.J. Boyle …………….. 0

R. McNicol ……………… 2                               A.K. Miller …………… 0

D. Innes …………………. 4                               A.W. Henderson ……… 0

N. McNicol ……………… 0                              J.H. Henderson ……….. 5

G.H. McLeod …………… 2                               T. Sinclair ……………. 0

Wm. McLeod …………… 5                               A. Rae ………………… 0

                                         -------                                                                --------

                                            29                                                                      16

 

Play being over, before returning to Thurso the Wick team enjoyed the hospitality of the Reay club in the Reay inn, where an excellent dinner was purveyed for them. After dinner an exchange of compliments took place to mark the enjoyment of the day’s outing. In the mname of the Wick team major Henderson acknowledged the hospitality of the Reay club, and expressed the pleasure they had had in playing over their course.

He hoped that the Reay players would visit Wick and play a return match at no very distant date.

Mr Morrison, replying for the Reay club, said they were very glad to see the Wick players at Reay. He hoped for future matches between them on the Wick course, and by a return visit of Wick club to Reay. The Wick club then returned to Thurso in time to catch the evening train home, after a pleasant day’s outing.

John O’ Groat Journal June 28th 1895.

Golf.

 

The local golfers are more enthusiastic at present than they have been since golf first started in Wick, and that was in 1871. Wednesday and Saturday are the principal practicing day’s on Reiss Links, and Mr Nicol, Station Hotel, is always prepared to drive golfers to and from the course at moderate charge of one shilling, providing that four or more players go at a time. This week Mr John Herd, St Andrews, was brought north to give the golfers some professional tuition. He was on the links on Wednesday along with Mr D.P. Henderson, of Stemster, and others. He has expressed himself highly pleased with the Reiss course, and says it will compare favourably with many of the best courses in Scotland.

 

John O’ Groat Journal May 14th 1897

Golf.

 

Nineteen members of the Wick golf  part in the half yearly match on Saturday. A gale of wind, which prevailed during the afternoon, affected the play to a considerable extent. In two instances balls dropped and rested within six inches of holes, and were holed out by favourable gusts of wind. The following are the prize winners :- G.M. Joss, club medal and club, scratch 98 ; Andrew Bremner, Sheriffs star and club, 123 – 21 = 102 ; J Harrison, club, 117 – 12 = 105 ; E.G. Buik, club, 129 – 24 = 105 ; T Sinclair, two balls, 118 – 12 = 106.

 

 

 

John O’ Groat Journal May 21st 1897

Golf Match

 

On Saturday last a match was played at Reiss Links between the Wick and Thurso clubs.The Thurso players were nowhere, however, the home team winning by 73 holes up. Scores – Wick 75 ; Thurso 2. There were twelve players of each club.

 

John O’ Groat Journal September 3rd 1897.

Wick V Reay

 

The return match between  the Wick and Reay clubs was played at Reiss Links on Saturday, when Wick won by 10holes up. The following are the scores : -

 

                                    Wick                                                   Reay

 

A Gordon   ………………..     7                         G Gunn ………………………..  0

S S Goudie ………………..     0                         Mr Manson  …………………… 5

Dr Banks  ………………….    0                         A Morrison  …………………… 7

W Dick  ……………………    1                        D Macpherson   ………………..  0

C Fletcher  …………………   5                         A Pilkington  ………………….. 0

T S Boyle  …………………..  0                         A Grant  ……………………….  4

J H Henderson ………………. 6                        Wm McLeod  …………………. 0

W Randall  ………………….. 1                         R Macpherson  ………………..  0

Jas Campbell ………………..  2                         D Innes ……………………….  0

 

  1. 16

 

John O’ Groat Journal, October 8th 1897.

Golf Match

 

The half yearly match of the Wick club was played on Reiss Links on Saturday when A Gordon, Killimster, carried off the club medal, club, and silver ball with a scratch score of 85. Other prizes takers were : - Thomas Sinclair, 102 less 12 = 90, Sheriffs star and club ; W. W. Leith, 105 less 12 = 93, club ; G. M. Joss, 86 plus 8 = 94, four balls ; M Considine, 107 less 12 = 95, Three Balls ; G. S. Wilson, 108 less 12 = 96, two balls.

John O’ Groat Journal, May 20th 1898.

Annual Meeting and Half Yearly match of the Wick Golf Club.

______________

New Club Fixtures

 

At the annual meeting of the Wick Golf Club, held in Randall’s Station Hotel last week, A. W. Henderson Esq. Of Bilbster, Presiding, various improvements in the club’s fixtures were arranged with the view of encouraging young players, and making the game more attractive. Major Henderson intimated that he would give a prize for the best six recorded scores for play on Wednesday monthly matches, the prizes to become the property of the winner. Mr Dick agreed to give a prize of six balls to the member who has recorded the most attendances on Saturday up till May, 1899.

A similar prize was intimated by Mr Goudis for the benefit of those who are better able to attend on Wednesdays. The winner of silver monthly golf ball, gets a ball along with it, presented by Mr Robertson. The interests of the Lady members were also attended to, and it was arranged to have a prize to be competed for by the Ladies who are members of the club. A suggestion was made that in order to attract a greater number of young members, half the ordinary subscription only should be payable by those under a certain age ; the suggested age being twenty. It was left to a committee to arrange. It was announced that the Captains Trophy had been won by Mr Sinclair, Chief Constable, who was closely run by Mr Joss, the previous holder of the trophy.

 

The Half Yearly Match

 

Took place on Saturday, when eighteen members played. The play all over was not up to the usual. The following were the prize winners :-

 

G. M. Joss ( Scratch ), club medal and club  …………..                           92

D. Brown, Sheriff’s Star and Club  …………………….        100 – 12 = 88

A. Robertson, Club   ……………………………………        118 – 24 = 94

W. L. Randall, 4 Balls   …………………………………       107 – 9 =   98

Ernest Buik, 3 Balls   ……………………………………       110 – 12 = 98

A. Gordon, 2 Balls    …………………………………….       98 + 1 =    99

 

John O’ Groat Journal June 3rd 1898

 

Wick Club V Teachers

           

At a match on Saturday last between five teachers and an equal number of the Wick golf club the latter won, as will be seen from the undernoted scores, by 13 holes ; -

 

                                           Teachers                                             Wick

 

D. L. Phease  ………………………….. 0             G. M. Joss ………………………   3

A. Gordon   …………………………… 8             W. Smith ( Fores ) ………………  0

W. Dick  ………………………………. 0             S.S. Goudie ……………………..  8

- Houston  …………………………….. 0             Dr Banks ……………………….   8

J. Allan  ………………………………. 0              A. K. Millar  ……………………   2

 

  1.                                                                        21

John O’ Groat Journal July 1st 1898.

Golf

 

Annual Contest for the County Cup on Dunnet Links

Victory for the Wick Club

 

The most important golfing fixture of the season is now the contest for the County Cup, which takes place annually on Dunnet Links. During recent years considerable attention has been given to the naturally attractive links of Dunnet. By improved hotel accommodation and in various other ways Dunnet is becoming popularised as a golfers resort.

The proprietor, Lieut, Alexander Sinclair of Freswick, three years ago presented a handsome silver cup to be competed for annually by Caithness golfers on Dunnet Links, which is the home course of the Thurso club, and those devotees of the game who reside at Castletown, Dunnet and the vicinity. The first year, the cup was won by Thurso, last year by Wick, and at the contest which took place on Saturday last additional interest was given by the pescence of three competing teams, Thurso, Wick and Reay. Though a disagreeabl’e morning the afternoon proved ideal weather, and an interesting and most enjoyable contest came off, which ended in a decisive victory for the Wick club. Each club was represented by a team of ten, who were drawn to play in couples according to their reputation as players. The Wick and Thurso teams were represented by their strongest players, and Reay also had their “ Cracks” forward, but the Reay team taking it all over was not so strongly represented as usual. When the tickets had all been handed in, showing a balance in favour of Wick, the golfers met in the Hotel, where Mr Murray had ample provision made for their entertainment.

 

The Presentation Of The Cup

 

To the winning team was formally made by Mr Donald Innes, Borlum, in a few appropriate remarks, in which he expressed the pleasure it gave them to meet in such an enjoyable contest. Having complimented the Wick team on their playMr Innes took ocxasion to express the wish as a Reay player that Wick would not have the honour of carrying the trophy next year. The cup, filled to the brim with the wine of the country, was passed round, and assembled golfers partaking thereof expressed mutual sentiments of brotherhood. Mr Henderson of Stempster proposed as a special toast the health of his youthful partner in the game. A. Sinclair from Reay, a youngster whose play promises well for the future of the Reay Club. When the Reay and Thurso clubs had departed the Wick players, according to custom, sat down to dinner in the Hotel, with Major Henderson in the chair. An excellent dinner was served by Mr Murray, and an hour passed pleasantly in discussing the comparative prowess of those engaged in the play. The arrangements for the contest, which had been made by the secretaries of the club’s represented, were satisfactory to all, and the proceedings throughout were as harmonious as a golfers holiday ought to be. The following are the results of the day’s play ; -

 

J.M. Joss, Wick   ……….. 6     D.L. Phease, Thurso   ………. 0

Wm. Smith, Thurso  …….4      A. Morrison, Reay …………. 0

A.S. Manson, Reay …….. 4     A. Gordon, Wick …………… 0

Dr Durran, Thurso ……    3      Dr Banks, Wick  ……………. 0

S.S. Goudie, Wick …….  7      Wm McLeod, Reay …………. 0

A. Grant, Reay ………… 5      Capt. Taylor, Thurso ………..  0

A.K. Millar, Wick ……..  3      Wm Macdonald, Reay ……… 0

Robert Mackay, Reay …. 1       R. Bruce, Thurso  …………..  0

Wm Dick, Wick ……….  1       A. McKidd, Thurso ………..  0

J. H. Henderson, Wick … 6       D. McLeod, Reay ………….  0

Tom Morrison, Reay …..  4       R. Lindsay, Thurso ………..  0

Jas Henderson, Wick ….  5        J. Hourston, Thurso ……….   0

Donald Innes, Reay ……. 0       D.W. Georgeson, Wick …..   0

Wm Jack, ( Thurso ) …..  6        Jas Campbell, Wick ……….. 0

D.P. Henderson ( Thurso ) 1      A. Sinclair, Reay ………….. 0

 

              Total for Wick  …   …    ….  28

                       “     Thurso …   …  …  14

                       “     Reay …   ….  ….    14

 

John O’ Groat Journal September 2nd 1898

Golf

 

A match was played on Saturday at Reiss Links between Wick and Thurso clubs, when the visitors won by 2 holes up. The following are the scores : -

 

                                 Wick                                                     Thurso

                                             Holes Up                                                         Holes Up

J.M Joss ……………………….   0               Wm Smith  …………………….    0

A. Gordon …………………….   0                Harrold Henderson …………….   3

S.S. Goudie  …………………..   0                Wm Gunn ………………………  7

Dr Banks ………………………  2                Dr Durran  ……………………..   0

Wm Dick ……………………..    0                J.S. Sutherland …………………  0

A.K. Millar ……………………   0                R. Bruce ……………………….   6

Tom Sinclair ………………….   6                 A. McKidd …………………….  0

A.W. Henderson ……………..    0                 Captain Sutherland ……………   1

James Campbell ………………  2                 D.P. Henderson ………………..   0

W.L. Randall …………………   5                 Sinclair McDonald …………….  0

 

                                           Holes   15                                                          Holes 17

John O’ Groat Journal June 9th 1899

Golf 

Match At Reay

 

The Wick club sent a team of Ten players to play a friendly match at Reay on Saturday last. The weather, though threatening in the morning, was splendid, and continued so till the end of play. The course was in extra good condition, and Grant had the greens in perfection. Subjoined is the list of the teams with the result :-

 

                              Wick                Holes                             Reay          Holes

Gordon …………………………    6         Morrison …………………   0

Banks ………………………….     0         Manson …………………..  1

Fletcher ………………………..     0         Grant ……………………… 8

Goudie  ………………………..     0          W. McLeod ………………  4

Dick …………………………….   0          McPherson ……………….  5

Miller ………………………….    1           Mackay …………………    0

Henderson ……………………..    0          Macdonald ………………   7

T. Sinclair …………………….     0          Tom Morrison ……………  0

Randall …………………………  0           G.H. Macleod ……………. 1

Harrison …………………………  0          A. Sinclair  ……………….  3

 

                              Total ………… 7                               Total ………..  29

 

                                                    Majority For Reay 22 Holes

 

John O’ Groat Journal September 1st 1899

Golf Match at Reiss Links – Wick V Reay.

 

A match took place at Reiss Links on Saturday between the Reay and Wick clubs, when the former won by 2 holes. The following are the scores : -

 

                                Wick                                                           Reay

Gordon ………………………..  3                  Manson ………………………….  0

Fletcher ……………………….  0                  Grant ……………………………   2

Banks …………………………  1                  Pilkington ………………………   0

Goudie ………………………..  1                  W. Macleod ……………………     0

Dick …………………………    4                  Macdonald ………………………. 0

Miller ………………………..    7                  Mackay ………………………….  0

J.H. Henderson ……………….  0                  A. Morrison …………………….   11

Sinclair ……………………….. 0                  T. Morrison ……………………..   3

Randall ……………………….  2                   G.H. Macleod ………………….   0

Georgeson ……………………  0                   A. Sinclair ……………………..    4

 

                                 Totals           18                                             Totals                20

John O’ Groat Journal October 27th 1899

Golf

 

Playing on the Reiss Links on Thursday evening of last week Mr Gunn, Inspector of Schools, tied with the Professional record for the green, which was established by John Herd of St Andrews, two or three years ago. The following are the details of Mr Gunn’s fine score : -

 

                 1st Round ………….   4,4,5,5,4,5,4,4,4, - 39

                 2nd Round ………….  3,4,4,5,4,4,5,5,4, - 38

                                                                                  ____

                                                                                    77

 

 

John O’ Groat Journal September 15th 1899

 

Wick V Thurso

 

A match was played on Saturday at Reiss Links between the Thurso and Wick clubs, when the former won by 5 holes. The following are the scores :-

 

                          Wick                                                             Thurso

Joss …………………………..  0             Balfour ……………………………  5

Gordon ……………………….. 4             Henderson ……………………….   0

Fletcher ………………………. 7             Gunn ……………………………..   0

Banks ………………………… 5             Smith …………………………….   0

Goudie ……………………….. 0             Phease ……………………………  1

Dick ………………………….  0             Taylor …………………………….  6

Miller ………………………..   0             Stewart …………………………… 0

Sinclair ………………………  0              Durran ……………………………  3

Randall ………………………  0              Bruce …………………………….  4

Georgeson …………………… 0              Moore ……………………………. 2

 

                              Total            16                                                Total             21

 

John O’ Groat Journal April 19th 1901.

 

The golf course on the links at Sinclairs bay is getting an “ Overhaul” and will soon be in excellent condition for the players of the Ancient game.

John O’ Groat Journal June 27th 1902

Wick V Reay.

 

After an absence of a year, the Wick club visited Reay last Saturday and played a friendly game with the Reay Club. There were ten players a side. The day was beautiful, and just ideal from a golfing point of view. Mr Grant had the course in good order, and the greens were very good. The following is a list of players, with their scores :-

 

                                  Wick                                             Reay

 

Gordon ……………………… 0                    Manson ……………………..3

J. Sinclair …………………… 0                    Grant ………………………. 7

A.K. Miller …………………. 1                    Macpherson ……………….. 0

D. Georgeson ………………. 0                     G.H. Macleod ……………..  6

J. Campbell …………………. 2                    Wm. Macleod ……………..  0

Major Henderson …………… 0                    Tom Morrison ……………   3

Mackenzie ………………….. 1                     Wm. Macdonald ………….. 0

Duff ………………………… 0                     D. Macleod ……………….. 3

Dr Dick …………………….. 0                     J. Murray …………………. 13

Mayo ……………………….  0                     Rod Fyfe …………………. 4

 

                          Total  ……… 4                               Total  ………………  39

 

Majority for Reay 35 Holes.

 

 

John O’ Groat Journal August 1st 1902.

Golf Match at Reiss.

 

Last Saturday an interesting golf match took place on the Reiss course between Mr Harold Henderson of the St Andrews and Thurso golf clubs, and Mr A. Gordon of the Wick club. Going out they were level, but Mr Gordon pulled ahead on the home journey, and finished an excellent round 3 up, the figure being :-

 

                           Gordon          5,4,5,5,4,6,4,4,3 – 40

                       Henderson         4,6,6,3,5,5,5,5,4 – 43

 

On the second round, Mr Gordon was “ Dormy” at the sixteenth hole, and securing a 4 pulled off the match 3 up and 1 to play.

The score for the second round was :-

 

                            Gordon        5,5,6,4,4,6,5,4,5 – 43

                       Henderson        6,4,4,5,4,4,5,6,3 – 41

 

Mr Gordon’s iron play was a faultless exhibition, while Mr Henderson’s tee shotswere the distinctive feature of a very strong game.

 

John O’Groat Journal August 29th 1902.

Golf.

 

Mr Harmsworth M.P., had a round of golf on the Reiss course on Wednesday along with his agent, Mr Georgeson. Mr Harmsworth made the remarkably fine score of 80 for the double round, beating his opponent by one hole. Mr Harmsworth’s score was as follows :-

 

First Round -      4,5,5,4,4,6,4,4,5 = 41.

Second Round – 5,4,5,5,4,5,4,3,4 = 39.

 

During the month the course at Reiss has been well attended by visitors from the South as well as local players. On Monday last while a townsman was driving off from the cable hut the ball in its flight along the bent on the left hand killed a rabbit.

 

John O’ Groat Journal October 10th 1902.

Golf.

 

There was a good muster of golfers on Reiss links on Saturday last to take part in the half yearly match. About a score of players were on the ground and a few spectators. The day was bright and favourable and some excellent play took place . The following were the

prize winners :-

 

  1. Gordon, club medal and club ……    88 + 3 = 91

      G. Mackenzie, sheriff’s star and club ..   92 – 5 = 87

      C. Fletcher, four balls …..                                      89

      J. Campbell, three balls …….                  98 – 3 = 95

      Dr Banks, two balls ……………..                         96

 

A club offered as a prize to players with a handicap of 15 and over was won by Dr Dick with a score of 115 -15 = 100. – On Wednesday six players had a friendly game. At the cable hut teeing ground during one of the rounds, a respected townsman proceeded to lift a handful of sand to tee his ball, when unfortunately his hand was caught in a rabbit trap. It is right to mention that the trap was not placed in the hole from which golfers generally lift sand, but was away about 17 feet from the teeing ground. It is satisfactory to know that the players hand was not too much injured.

John O’ Groat Journal May 10th 1907.

Wick Golf Club.

 

The annual general meeting of this club was held in the hall of the Carnegie Library on Tuesday evening. Col. Henderson, Captain of the club, Presided, and there was a very large turnout of members. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and approved, and the secretary and treasurer submitted their annual reports which were unanimously adopted.

The following office bearers were appointed, viz :- Hon. President, Duke of Portland : Vice-President, Sir George Duff Dunbar ; Captain, Lieutenant Colonel Henderson : Hon. Secretary, W.B.A. Scroggie : Hon. Treasurer, T. Faichney. Mr J. Skinner was appointed as an additional member of the committee, which otherwise, stands the same as last year. It was intimated that the extension of the course was now practically completed, and great satisfaction was expressed by the members over the improvement the new course would be on the old one. It was resolved to leave in the hands of the committee to arrange for procuring the services of some of the leading professionals for the formal opening of the course. A large number of new members were admitted to the club, and as these are mostly keen enthusiasts, everything points to the club having a very successful season. The new fixtures were arranged , and with the usual votes of thanks the meeting was brought to a close.

John O’ Groat Journal May 17th 1907.

Wick Golf Club.

 

The half yearly match of this club, for scratch and handicap prizes, took place on Saturday in beautiful weather. There was a very large turnout of members. The scratch medal was won by Mr W.B.A. Scroggie with the record score of 79, and the sheriff’s star was won by Mr John Skinner with a net score of 90. The following are the results of the day’s play, viz :- W.B.A. Scroggie ( + 3 ) 82 : John Skinner ( 24 ) 90 : J.R. Skinner ( 6 ) 94 : G.T. Mackenzie ( Scratch ) 96 : W.D. Barclay ( 6 ) 97 : - all prize winners. H.S. Goudie ( 9 ) 97 : P. Sinclair ( 18 ) 97 : A. McMillan ( scratch ) 98 : C. Fletcher ( scratch ) 98 : T.W. Faichney ( 6 ) 101 : Col. Henderson ( scratch ) 103 : T. Sinclair ( 3 ) 104 : M.E. Thomson ( 15 ) 108 : C.E. Ball ( 24 ) 109 : Geo. Banks ( 3 ) 110. On Saturday the tournament for the County Cup commences, and as there is every appearance of a big entry, a keen contest should be the result.

 

John O’ Groat Journal May 24th 1907.

Wick Golf Club.

 

The annual tournament for the County Cup, played for by the members of this club, commenced at Reiss Links last Saturday. The day was fine, and there was a large turnout of members.The following are the results of the first round, viz :- E. Laton ( 14 ) beat S.H. Goudie ( 7 ) by 4 up and 3. Dr Dick ( 7 ) beat G. O’Brian ( 18 ) by 7 up and 5. J. Skinner ( 18 ) beat J.R. Skinner ( 5 ) by 3 up and 2. G.L. Mackenzie ( Scratch ) beat Dr Dick ( Scratch ) after a tie, by 3 up and 2. W.B.A. Scroggie ( Owes 2 ) beat C. Fletcher ( Scratch ) by 7 up and 6. J. Sinclair ( 2 ) beat J. Faichney ( 5 ) by 2 up. A. Gordon ( owes 2 ) beat Col. Henderson ( Scartch ) by 3 up and 1. J.R. Forbes ( 14 ) beat C.E.Ball ( 18 ) by 5 up and 3.

John O’ Groat Journal July 5th 1907.

Golf.

Wick V Thurso.

 

A friendly game was played on Reiss links on Saturday between the Wick and Thurso golf clubs. The weather was favourable and there was a large turnout of players of both clubs. The game resulted in a win for the home team by eight matches. The score being – Wick 10 matches, Thurso 2. The following are the teams :-

 

                                Wick                                                 Thurso

 

  1. Gordon …………….. 1                          DR Durran …………………….. 0

G.T. Mackenzie ……….. 1                          W. Smith ………………………. 0

A. McMillan …………… 1                         W. Dick ……………………….. 0

C. Fletcher …………….. 0                          Mr McIvor …………………….. 1

G.M. Joss ………………. 0                         R. Bruce ……………………….. 1

D. Banks ……………….. 1                         W.M. Brims …………………… 0

G. Banks ………………. 1                          G. Irvine ……………………….. 0

J.R. Skinner ……………. 1                         R.V. Soutar …………………….. 0

T. Sinclair ……………… 1                         J.W. Galloway …………………. 0

T.W. Faichney …………. 1                         D. Sinclair ……………………… 0

S.H. Goudie ……………. 1                         D. Ryrie ……………………….. 0

H. Collins ………………. 1                        C.H. Williamson ………………..0

                                        --------                                                                      ---------

                                           10                                                                             2

John O’ Groat Journal Friday July 19th 1907.

Extension to Reiss Golf Course.

 

An Attractive Holiday Links

---------------

Described by The London

“ Daily News”

 

That the beautiful Links of Reiss have a future as a popular golf course no one can doubt who has played over them and knows their attractions. The stream of golf enthusiasts is steadily flowing north. The Reiss Links are being prepared for them.

The course has been extended to eighteen holes, and the ceremony of opening the extension is to be performed on Saturday, the 27th inst., by Mrs Duff Dunbar. The members are to entertain their friends to afternoon tea in the Marquee. With fine weather there is a prospect of a pleasant function.

-------------------

In a golf causerie in the London Daily News a special correspondent has given a descriptive column of the history and attractions of Wick Golf Club and their links at Reiss.

He makes the small error of stating that the club was founded in 1874. As a matter of fact it was founded in 1870, and has the proud distinction of being the oldest golf club north of the Grampians. The following are his notes on the

 

Holiday Links at Wick.

 

It is a far cry from Kings Cross to Caithness, the most northerly county of the Scottish mainland, but year by year we find the journey willingly undertaken by the tourist and holiday seeker in increasing numbers. This is because Caithness is a great sporting district, and can boast of some of the finest grouse moors and trout lochs in the land of the thistle, not to mention it’s salmon streams. The proximity of the Orkney Isles to the district of Morvern in Caithness – they are separated only by the waters of the Pentland Firth – is thus rather suggestive, but it is not the folklore of this part of the country, however interesting, that is our concern here, so we must leave it alone, and pass to our subject, which is Golf.

-------------------

Day and Night Golf.

 

The game has long been known and played in Caithness, but somehow or other it has not progressed at anything like the rate it has done in the adjoining county of Sutherland, with it’s headquarters at Dornoch. For some time past, however, an awakening has been apparent, and now the springs of action have been industriously set in motion. Instituted as far back as 1874 the Wick Golf Club must certainly be credited with having kept the game alive in the very far north.Its members were peculiarly fortunate in having permission to use a strip of exceptionally pretty links at Reiss, five-and –twenty minutes’ drive from the town, and upon this ground a highly sporting nine hole course was laid out. For many year the club membership consisted of a select band of devotees, of which the late Sheriff Thoms of Caithness and Orkneys – “ Admiral” of these islands – assumed the lead.

He was an eccentric little man, a circumstance which may have accounted for the fact, the good folk of the country for miles round about branded every one of the small group of golfers as slightly “ Loose on Top.” The hardy sons of toil, as these Caithness people certainly were, and still are, could not bring down their industry-directed minds to the level of believing that any sane man could fritter away his time amongst the sand dunes and bents of Reiss, aimlessly pursuing a little white ball the livelong day. But the sage opinions of the well-to-do farmers of the district and their locquacious “ Hinds” went for naught. The “ Mad Gowfers” pursued the even tenor of their way, spending on the links their days, and, it was popularly believed, their nights, too, for let it be understood that for two months in the year there is no darkness at all up there on the north of Caithness.

--------------------

Beautiful Golden Sands.

 

These, no doubt, were good old days, good for the few rather than for the many, but with links like Reiss available, and the incessant cry for more and better links for the constantly increasing golfing stream it was impossible for things to jog along for ever in what was after all more or less a selfish old rut. The fact is that for a place with a golfing history of more than thirty years it is surprising how long it has taken for the good people of Wick to rouse themselves up to the necessity of catering no longer for their own particular needs, but for the requirements of the modern holiday-maker.

If Reiss links were within forty minutes of Charing Cross, in a couple of years it would be as fine a golf course as Sandwich or Deal. The course skirts Reiss Bay, which runs north and south, and boasts of as fine a stretch of beautiful Golden Sands as are to be found anywhere.

Caithness rock scenery is justly famous, and at the southern extremity of the wide bay there are the imposing cliffs of Noss Head, crowned by a lighthouse, Achergill Tower, the ancestral home of the Duff Dunbars of Hempbriggs, dating back to the time of King Robert the Bruce of Scotland, is in close proximity to the starting point of the course, while between it and Noss Head are the ruins of two other castles, Sinclair and Girnigoe, both of great antiquity and historical interest.

-----------------------------

Round of Over Three Miles.

 

It was in the late autumn of last year that it was decided to extend the course from 9 to 18 holes – by no means a difficult operation – and through the generosity of Mrs Duff Dunbar, on whose property the links are situated, every facility has been given for carrying out the scheme, as well as substantial assistance in promoting it.

Reiss Links is the genuine seaside article, and is as nature made it, save the cutting and rolling of the putting greens, all of which are also natural, with their original undulations carefully preserved. The old course has, as far as possible, been worked into the new. The bunkers, all natural, are fairly numerous, more especially at the start and finish, and, according to modern ideas, are worked in on the flanks rather than utilised as cross-the-course hazards. The out-going measures 2,750 yards, and the in-coming 2,670 yards, so that the round is three miles and 140 yards in length. The distribution is as follows : Long Holes ( Those requiring three strokes ), 4 ; medium holes ( Above one drive and not more than two full drives ), 9 ; Short holes, 5.

The town of Wick contains good Hotel accommodation ; the tarrif for visitors playing on the links is little more than nominal as yet, and ready means of access between Wick and the links are available.

 

Northern Chronicle July 24th 1907.

Wick

The Extended Golf Course

 

The extended golf course at Reiss is to formally opened on Saturday by Mrs Duff Dunbar of Ackergill Tower, on whose property the course is laid out. Up till this year there had been a sporting nine hole course at Reiss, where Wick golfers enjoyed their round ; but last October, Mrs Duff Dunbar made an offer to the club to extend the course, at her own expense, to the full eighteen holes, if the latter would undertake the management of it.

The offer was, of course, readily accepted, and the work of extension at once entered upon. The new greens are already in good trim, and the club is enthusiastic in praise of the extended course, as are all who have seen it. It is fully three miles long. An old raised beach, which runs the entire length of the links, provides bunkers of proper quality and in the right position for regulating play. The turf is excellent, and the faiway by no means narrow. The holes vary in length, but as far as possible the drive and iron distance has been avoided. It was found necessary to drop out two of the old greens altogether ; and the seven that were utilised were brought in somewhat differently from their former rotation, care being taken , however, to retain the excellent carries that had been a feature of the old course. There are two holes on each journey that measure about 450 yards ; two outwards and three inwards that can be reached from the tee in one shot, and other nine all over 300 yards in length. The situation of the course in close proximity to the beautiful sands of Reiss Bay, is all that can be desired.

John O’ Groat Journal August 2nd 1907.

 

The Extended Golf Course at Reiss

------------------------

Opening Ceremony.

 

On Saturday last the Wick Golf Club had the satisfaction of seeing that come to pass for which they had hankered for some time.

They saw the course at Reiss, which has recently been enlarged, formally opened for play by Mrs Duff Dunbar of Hempbriggs, on whose property the extended course is laid out.

There was formerly a fairly good course at Reiss, whre the local votaries of the ancient game have enjoyed many a pleasant round, but it only consisted of nine holes, and members felt that they could enjoy better sport with an increase to eighteen.

This was how matters stood when in October last Mrs Duff Dunbar, the proprietrix of the links, made an offer to the club to extend the course at her own expense to the full 18 holes, if the latter would take the management of it. The offer was, of course, readily accepted and the work of extension at once entered upon. The committee of the club carefully considered their scheme, and consulted among others the eminent northern player, Mr John Sutherland, Dornoch, who willingly advised them, and the outcome of their negotiations and planning is that now an eighteen hole course of great variety, interest, and excellence has been prepared.

The new greens are already in good trim, and all who have seen and tried the new course are enthusiastic in praise of it. The course is fully three miles long. An old raised beach, which runs the entire length of the links, provides bunkers of proper quality and in the right position for regulating play. The turf is excellent and the fairway by no means narrow. The holes vary in length, but as far as possible the drive and iron distance has been avoided.

It was found necessary to drop out two of the old greens altogether, and the seven that were utilised were brought in somewhat differently from their former rotation, care being taken , however, to retain the excellent carries that were a feature of the old course.

There are two holes on each journey that measure about 450 yards, two outwards and three inwards that can be reached from the tee in one shot, and other nine all over 300 yards in length. The course is situated in close proximity to Reiss Bay, the sandy beach surrounding which is claimed to be about the finest in the country.

The Reiss course as now extended can be ranked among the best golf courses in the country, and it is firmly believed that when its value becomes better known it will atain high popularity and attract an increased number of summer visitors to the far north.

The ceremony of opening the new course was, as already said, performed on Saturday last. There was a very large turnout of club members and their friends, both ladies and gentlemen, from 150 to 200 being present, and a most pleasant afternoon was enjoyed.

The Captain of the club, Colonel Henderson and Mrs Henderson, Bellevue, entertained the visitors to tea about 4 o’clock in a large Marquee erected beside the first tee, after which the company disposed themselves to witness

 

The Opening Ceremony.

 

Colonel Henderson, The Captain of the club,in introducing Mrs Duff Dunbar, said – The extension of the Wick golf course to the full 18 holes has now been carried out, and we are met here to-day for the opening ceremony. The club is the oldest north of the Grampians – ( Applause ) and has been in existence for over 37 years, during which period it has had many ups and downs. When first formed, the course was where the Bignold Park now is, and occasionally matches were played on Reiss Links. Then we played for a few years on fields at the South Head, and for the last 25 years on Reiss Links. Since the club has been in possession of this course a considerable sum has been laid out in making and maintaining the course, consequently it has always been in a chronic state of impecuniosity, and I can safely say that as a good sporting nine hole course it was second to none.

The extension of the course is entirely due to Mrs Duff Dunbar’s kindness and generosity. ( Applause ). And had it not been that she offered a very handsome subscription and to give the ground on the old terms, which was certainly most moderate, the club could not have faced the expense. ( Applause )

The new course is now in fairly good order, but the making of a course takes years, in fact is never in a completed state, and it will be some time before it can be got into really first class order. However, there is no doubt we have an ideal subject to work on and in time we will have one of the best in the kingdom. ( Applause )

We are indebted to Mr Sutherland, secretary of the Royal Dornoch Golf Club, for his assistance in laying out the golf course – ( Applause ) – and it is most gratifying that all who have played over it are highly pleased. With a course such as we now have there is little doubt, considering the demand for holiday links, that Wick will some day become one of the large summer golfing resorts. All that is wanted is a good Hotel near the links to make it more convenient for players. We are all very glad indeed to see so many here to-day, which shows that an interest is now being taken in golf , and we shall be very pleased if any of you, who are not members, will join the club and take to the ancient game. I have now much pleasure in asking Mrs Duff Dunbar to declare the course open. ( Loud Applause ).

Sheriff Stuart felt sure it would be agreeable to them all that they should accord a hearty welcome to Mr John Sutherland, Dornoch, who had done so much in extending the golf course and also for coming there and seeing them enter on their new venture. ( Applause )

Mr D.P. Henderson returned the thanks of the club to the Wick Council who had turned out in their corporate capacity to show that interest in golf coincide with the interest of Wick.

( Applause ).

Mrs Duff Dunbar, with golf club in hand, said – I have much pleasure in declaring the course open. ( Loud Applause ).

An interesting game between Mr John Sutherland and Mr E. Grant, Dornoch, both back markers in their club, was then played over the extended course, and the spectators found it really a rich entertainment to watch the magnificent play of these two stalwart exponents of the game. The result of the round was as follows :-

 

Grant :-             Out – 5,5,5,3,5,4,3,6,3 – 39

                            In – 4,3,5,3,3,4,3,4,3 – 35

                                                                ------

                                                                  74

 

Sutherland :-     Out – 5,6,5,4,5,5,5,5,4 – 44

                             In – 5,3,5,4,4,3,4,5,5 – 38

                                                                 -------

                                                                    82

John O’ Groat Journal October 11th 1907.

Golf.

 

The half yearly match was played on Reiss lInks on Saturday afternoon. The weather was fine and there was a fair turnout of members. The following are the scores :- 1, G.T. Mackenzie ( Scratch medal and club ) 90 ; 2, John Gowans ( Handicap medal and club ) 108 less 24 – 84 ; 3, S.H. Goudie ( club ) 98 less 9 – 89 ; 4, T.W. Faichney ( 4 golf ball ) 97 less 6 – 91 ; 5, J.R. Forbes ( 3 golf balls ) 109 less 18 – 91 ; 6, Dr Banks ( Scratch 2 golf balls ) 92 ; 7, C. Fletcher ( Scratch ) 95 ; 8, J.R. Skinner 102 less 6 -96 ; 9, W.D. Barclay 105 less 6 – 99 ;10, John Skinner 117 less 18 – 99.

John O’ Groat Journal February 28th 1908.

New record for Reiss Golf Course.

 

Playing a fourball match on Saturday, Tom Jamieson, the professional greenkeeper of the Wick Golf Club, went round in 73, made up as follows :-

 

Out   ……… 3,4,4,4,5,5,5,4,3 – 37

In ………….5,3,4,4,3,4,3,5,5 -  36

 

The former record of the course was held by Tom Grant, Dornoch, who playing round with Mr Sutherland, Dornoch, returned a score of 74 on the opening day of the new eighteen hole course. In an advertisement on our front page to-day the golf club invite persons who have furnished lodgings to let in the town or its vicinity to advertise the fact in the list of furnished lodging for 1908, issued by the Highland Railway Company. See advertisement.

 

John O’ Groat Journal May 1st 1908

Golfing Notes.

A Retrospect.

 

In the “ Golfers” Guide to the greens of Scotland ( 1894 ) we find the following description of the Wick Golf Club’s old course at Reiss. :-

The links skirt the beautiful bay of Ackergill, about three miles from the town of Wick and fourteen miles from John O’Groats. From the course a magnificent view is to had of the imposing castles of Sinclair and Girnigoe, the former seat of the Earls of Caithness. This is perhaps the most fascinating and Picturesque ruin in Scotland. Close to the course stands the well-known residence of the Dunbar Family, Askergill Tower, one of the grandest and most commanding seats in the north.

It is a nine hole course at present, measuring about a mile and a half, but the ground is unlimited. The turf is fine and short and the soil sandy. The bunkers are well place and natural, and while some of the holes are comparatively easy, other are regular sporting holes ; and it would be difficult to find a more Unique Course in the “ Land of Golf.”

 

____________

 

The scenery is unchanged, but the scene is changed. Many of the original members, who formed the club in 1870, and learned their golf on the ground which now forms the Bignold Park, are gone, their matches are forgotten, and this ground, which knew golfers once, knows them no more.

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The nine hole course at Reiss, which knew the old conservative golfers so well for thirty years back, now knows them no more ; that field of a thousand bloodless battles in now only the graveyard of tens of thousands of hardy Gutta’s, and most of them rest in hades – the certain reward of insubordination. The “ Snipe,” the “ Kite,” the “ Falcon” and the “ Hawk” fly exultingly over their graves.

 

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Colonel Bogey alone returns from the slaughter with his escutcheon all but untarnished, only to buckle on fresh armour and fight battles in a strange land against armies of “ Rubber Cored” Philistines. He cast his eye over the new country, amazed at its possibilities – Jamieson demands his passport, and directs him to the base of his operations where he boldly tees a “ Captain.”

 

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Excellent progress is being made with the improvements on the new course. New teeing grounds have been made at at mostly all the holes, and impossible bunkers have been faced up in a manner that would do credit to any championship course. Unfair hazards have been dealt with, and in another month or so the putting greens will be in first rate order. The professional should feel proud of the wonderful change for the better which he has brought on the complexion of the course.

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We understand that offers have been accepted for the erection of a new pavilion, and that probably the building will be started next week. The plan shows ample accommodation – viz., a central hall, with ladies sitting room and dressing room to the left, and gentlemens rooms to the right, while behind there is a three roomed house for the greenkeeper. The features of the front elevation are very pleasing.

 

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There is no excuse now for the ladies of the town not becoming adepts at the game, and there is no reason why Wick should not in a year or two send a representative to the ladies championship. We believe that afternoon teas at Reiss will be very popular, but the lady aspirants to the championship must tee first and tea afterwards.

 

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We expect to be able to give a golfing column occasionally during the ensuing summer. Another interesting budget of notes will follow in a week or two.

John O’ Groat Journal June 26th 1908.

Midnight Golf.

Wick club’s Unique Enterprise.

 

The Wick golf club embarked on a unique enterprise last week. On Friday evening a company of club members and their friends, to the number of about fifty all told, drove out of Wick to the Reiss golf course, and there from shortly after midnight till nigh six o’clock on Saturday morning they pursued with keen enjoyment the ancient and classic pastime.

Starting from Wick on the stroke of twelve, the party arrived on the links before 12.30, and immediately prepared to get their outfits in order for a round of the course. But the gods intervened. The sky became overcast with thick murky clouds, and some rain began to fall. The light was too dull to allow a start being made immediately, and perforce the ardent “ Gowfers” had to adjourn for about an hour, what time they whiled away the interval with a hurriedly organised concert. About 2 o’clock however, the light had improved sufficiently to warrant a commencement of play. At that early hour the company congregated in front of the new club-house, when the group was photographed by Mr Johnstone, Wick. The photographer had finished by 2 o’clock, when a general start was made with the special competitions arranged for the occasion. For the first hole or two the balls were difficult to follow, but by 2.30 the sun’s disc had appeared complete above the horizon, and the cold grey light was dispelled with glorious rays of golden hue.

Play was continued under exceedingly pleasant conditions, and with great enjoyment, until 5.30am, the scores returned being all very creditable. The lowest score was 95, while the highest was considerably over 100.

This unique venture was promoted to signalise the the completion of a design which the golf club have entertained for some time. It marked the accomplishment of the extension of the Reiss Links from a nine hole course to an eighteen hole course. It is true that the eighteen hole course was opened for play last year, but still there remained some finishing touches to be made, to carry out which the club early this year called in a professional player and skilled greenkeeper, namely, Mr Tom Jamieson, under whose supervision the complexion of the course had been wonderfully improved during the last few months.

It was in the late autumn of last year that it was decided to extend the course from 9 to 18 holes – by no means a difficult operation – and through the generosity of Mrs Duff Dunbar, on whose property the links are situated, every facility has been given for carrying out the scheme, as well as substantial assistance in promoting it.

Reiss Links is the genuine seaside article, and is as nature made it, save the cutting and rolling of the putting greens, all of which are also natural, with their original undulations carefully preserved. The old course has, as far as possible, been worked into the new. The bunkers, all natural, are fairly numerous, more especially at the start and finish, and, according to modern ideas, are worked in on the flanks rather than utilised as cross-the-course hazards. The out-going measures 2,750 yards, and the in-coming 2,670 yards, so that the round is three miles and 140 yards in length. The distribution is as follows : Long Holes ( Those requiring three strokes ), 4 ; medium holes ( Above one drive and not more than two full drives ), 9 ; Short holes, 5.

The town of Wick contains good Hotel accommodation ; the tarrif for visitors playing on the links is little more than nominal as yet, and ready means of access between Wick and the links are available.

John O’ Groat Journal July 24th 1908.

Record score on Reiss Golf Course.

 

Mr J. Jamieson, the Wick professional, playing with Mr A.D.. Mackenzie, Ashford, Kent, on Tuesday, made a record for the Reiss course. The scores were as follows :- Mr Mackenzie – 5-4-4-4-5-4-4-5-4-7-4-6-5-3-6-3-7-4 –total-84. Mr Jamieson – 4-3-4-3-4-3-3-5-4-6-3-5-5-3-4-2-7-5 – 73. Mr Mackenzie, who is a native of Wick, is a player of considerable promise, and his score of 84 is highly creditable for one to whom the course is new, and although it is far eclipsed by the exceptional score of 73 put on by the professional.

John O’ Groat Journal, Friday August 14TH 1908.

 

Wick Golf Club

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Opening of The New Pavilion.

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Interesting Ceremony at Reiss.

 

Inspired by lofty ambitions the Wick Golf Club have been doing things during the past two years. They have extended the course at Reiss from a nine hole to an eighteen hole course. They have engaged a professional greenkeeper to keep it in order, and to carry out any possible improvements which may be found necessary. Under his supervision the extended course has been developed and trimmed to such good purpose, that already it is regarded as a first rate resort for devotees of the ancient and classic pastime.

And there are still possibilities of improvement about it, if only the funds were procurable.

To replenish their exhausted coffers the club are presently organizing a grand bazaar which will come off about the end of this monthin the Pulteney Town Academy. The proceeds of this, it is hoped, will not only clear away some debt which the club have found it essential to incur, but will also leave a surplus sufficient to enable the work of improvement to go on.

Among other work which the club have deemed necessary to popularise the course, has been the erction of a new club-house or Pavilion. The old house, which has done service for the past 16 years or more, has become obsolete and quite inadequate for the present requirements of the club, and fired by a great enthusiasm, the members would not rest until they had it replaced by a more modern building with all up-to-date facilities for accommodating players.

This building has been erected. The work was lately completed, and on Wednesday last the house was formally opened.

This event, the opening ceremony, was evidently considered of much importance by the golfing fraternity, and there was a big muster of members of the club on the links.

A varied and interesting series of entertainments was arranged for the afternoon, and in prospect of spending a glorious half-holiday many friends of the golfers were induced to join in the festivities of the occasion.

From three o’clock onwards visitors arrived by bus, motor car or bicycle, and when the business was begaun about four o’clock a large and fashionable gathering of some hundreds of people were surrounding the front of the Pavilion.

 

The Opening Ceremony.

 

Was performed by Miss Peggy Henderson, the six year-old daughter of Colonel Henderson, Bellvevue.

Sheriff Dudley Stuart was deputed to present her the key with which to open the pavilion door, and in handing over this article he said :- Ladies and Gentlemen, I have been asked to perform a very interesting ceremony, namely to present Miss Peggy Henderson with the key to our new clubhouse which we are going to open to-day. I shall do in three words, because I’ve had a hint that some of the ladies are very anxious to adjourn to the tent for tea.

I will only remark that we have to-day round about us and behind us here an object lesson of the progress and ambition of our golf club. I believe in the old days, the only shelter the golfers had was to get into the nearest bunkers ( Laughter )

Then they built the little shanty at the back which we now use for  holding our bicycles. Further progress was made when we built the clubhouse which we have up till to-day been using, and which will now, I presume, serve some subsidiary purpose. And this is the latest – the building which we are about to open – and I think it might well be described, as the life of a famous President of the United States was described – from log cabin to White House. ( Laughter and Applause.) Iam not going to discourse to you the merits of the clubhouse of which, at present, you can only see the outside, but as soon as the door has been duly opened by Miss Peggy Henderson, you will all be invited to come in and examine its nooks and corners.

With this he handed over the key to Miss Henderson in a few words, and the little girl tripping lightly up to the door inserted the key, and the door was thrown open.

Colonel Henderson returned thanks for the honour which had been bestowed on his young daughter. In doing so he said – I am very pleased indeed to see so many of you here to-day. It shows the interest that is now taken in golf. As the Sheriff has said, our first venture in the way of houses was the little hut behind, which served the purpose for many years. When the membership of the club increased it was found necessary to get a larger house and we built the old pavilion next door, which was certainly a very great comfort to the members for sixteen years or more. Then, this is our third venture.

I have no doubt some people think that it is a bit of absurd extravagance, but I can assure you the club have most carefully considered the matter, and I feel confident that it will be for the  prosperity of the club ( Applause )

The Bazaar which is to be opened in a fortnight, we hope will pay the debt on this house, and not only the debt on the house, but we trust we shall have sufficient funds to enable us to continue improving the course until it is got into first-class order and becomes self-supporting. ( Applause.)

I am glad to say that the membership of the club has very much increased of late, and everything must be done to poularise the game. I have to thank the committee most heartily for so kindly asking my daughter to open this new pavilion. I am sure she will always look back in after years with pride and pleasure on this occasion and the very nice souvenir which has to-day been given her. I thank you all heartily. ( Applause.)

The key, which was used to open the door, and which was presented to Miss Hendersonas a souvenir of the occasion, was a neat silver article supplied by Mr John Milne, Jeweller, Union St. It bore the following inscription ; Wick Golf Club – Presented to Miss Henderson, Bellevue on the opening of the pavilion, 12 August, 1908.

When the formal business had been completed, some of the company betook themselves to a Marquee on the ground where tea was served, while others inspected the building.

 

The New Pavilion.

 

Is a fairly large structure, built of wood on a brick foundation. It has a neat and substantial appearance externally, while inside the furnishings are of the choicest woods and elegant workmanship. The superstructure is painted white on the outside with green facings, the portion immediately above the brick being stained with a walnut colour. The roof is red with black cresting and four finials. On the bright sunshine of Wednesday afternoonthe pavilion made a splendid appearance, and was generally admired.

The frony of the building, along which runs a verandah with a concrete floor and glass roof, looks out towards the course. The front entrance opens in a spacious hall, of which runs some smaller compartments – to the right a ladies room with lavatory accommodation, and on the left a gentlemens dressing room with another nondescript apartment for the use of male members. Round the walls of these rooms are lockers, where members may store their clubs and other golfing requisites. The green-keeper’s private rooms are to the rear. They consist of a parlour, two bedrooms, and a kitchen, with the necessary outhouse accommodation. The pavilion is orovided with a water supply, and all appurtenances are provided for the brewing of tea. The building is a very up-to-date, comfortable and useful place for the purpose it has to serve. The contractors were a southern firm, for whom Mr D.H. Wares, Ironmonger, is agent in Wick, while Mr Bisset was the architect of the building.

 

A Professional Match.

 

One of the attractions of the afternoon was a triangular match, which took place immediately after tea, between the following professionals :-  Mr W. Fernie, Jnr, Troon ; Mr A. Simpson, Brora, and late of Cruden Bay, and Mr Jamieson, the professional who looks after the Reiss course. An interesting match ended in a tie – 85 each – between Fernie and Jamieson, the other professional having dropped out.

 

A List of Visitors.

 

Among the gatering which enjoyed the afternoonon the links, were a number of natives home on holiday, and other strangers at present sojourning in the county. Among the company present we noticed :- Sheriff Stuart and Miss Stuart, Stirkoke ; Colonel Henderson and party, Bellevue ; Misses Henderson, Rosebank, and Miss Wynne and Miss Chalmers ; Ex-Provost Rae and Mrs Rae, Wick ; Mrs Horne of Stirkoke ; Mrs Bruce, Alston ; Mrs Havelock and Mrs R. Bruce, Wick ; Miss H. Craig, Fort William ; Dr Banks, Wick ; Baillie Ferguson, Thurso ; Mr and Mrs T. Meridith, Commercial Hotel ; Mr and Mrs Charles Fletcher, West Banks, and Nurse Sanderson ; Mr and Mrs George Banks, Sinclair Terrace ; Mr and Mrs Milligan, Dempster Street ; Mr John Harper and Miss Harper, Thurso Road ; Mr Dick and Miss Dick ; Colonel and Mrs Buik ; Mr Sinclair Reid and Miss Reid, Aukland ; Miss Heloise Barron, Aberdeen ; Mrs Robertson and Mr Joe Robertson ; Mr and Mrs D.W. Gunn, Back Bridge Street ; Mr R.J. Sinclair and Miss Sinclair, Union Street ; Miss Sinclair, Dalziel Crescent ; Mr and Mrs WM. Banks ; Miss Lindsay, Perth ; Miss Waters, Shore Lane ; Mr and Mrs T.W. Faichney, and Miss Jean Trotter ; Dr Macdonald, Wick ; Mr A. Macmillan, do ; Dr Lochhead ; Miss Maggie Nicolson, Wick ; and Miss J. Mackay, Tain ; Miss Myra Ross, Argyle Square ; the Misses Leith, Bexley Terrace ; Mr Roderick Ross, Edinburgh ; Miss Williamson, Northcote Street ; Miss Nicol, Dempster Street ; Nurse Macgillivray ; Mr W.D. Barclay and party ; the Misses Crawford, Sinclair Terrace ; Miss Taylor ; Mrs Hector Sutherland, Miss Mackay, Miss Burn, Miss Reid, Mrs W. Cormack, Mr Tait, Edinburgh ; Miss Mackenzie and Mrs John Cormack ; Misses Mowat, Montpellier House ; Mr Leitch, Redditch ; Misses Larnach ; Misses Skinner, Huddart Street ; Miss Williamson, Vansittart Street ; Miss McEwan, Mr C. Crowe, London ; Miss S. Sinclair, Miss Matheson, Edinburgh ; Mrs Flett, Dempster Street ; Mr H. Flett and Miss Flett, Dempster Street ; Mrs Weir, Sinclair Terrace ; and Miss Maud Weir ; Miss L. Forbes, Miss Maggie Wares ; Mr Geo. Harrold ; Mr G. Kellyand Mrs Kelly ; Mrs Middleton, Mrs Hunter, Mrs and Miss Simpson, Mr Falconer and party ; Mr D. Ross and Mr J. Ross ; Mr R.S. Waters, Mr D.H. Wares, Miss Baikie, Mr A. Sinclair, and a host of others.

After the opening ceremony the visitors were photographed in front of the pavilion by Mr George Mackenzie, representing Mr Humphrey, and by Mr Johnston, Market Place.

John O’ Groat Journal August 28th 1908.

 

Wick Golf Club Bazaar.

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First Days Proceedings.

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Opening Ceremony by Her Grace

The Duchess of Portland

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Descriptions of the Concerts,

Theatricals, and Side Shows.

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The Golf Club Bazaar, which was opened here on Wednesday and will continue until to-night, is certainly the most gigantic enterprise of it’s kind that has ever been promoted in the town. Preperations were begun almost a year ago, and since then many hands and heads have been conspiring to make it an unprecedentedly huge concern, and they have succeeded.

A wealth of rare, costly, magnificent and useful articles were brought to-gether such as has probably never graced a Bazaar’s stalls in the annals of the county.

The organisers were fortunate in obtaining the use of the Pulteneytown Academy in which to hold the event. No ther building could adapt itself so well for the purpose they had in view. Two of the largest classrooms served as sale rooms- no doubt they were rather congested at times, but generally the accommodation was ample – while the multitude of smaller rooms which branch off the two main lobbies, along with the new wing of the school, were utilised for the side- shows, and each apartment fulfilled the special purpose for which it was reserved most admirably. There was such a medley of entertainments with a room set apart for each, that the visitor frequently stood bewildered amid the host of directions which met him at every turn – to the Sports, the theatre, the palmist, the refreshment room, to the concerts, the conjurer, the punch and judy man, and so on.

Every inch of space was utilised, and though the Academy may be rather limited in accommodation for it’s present assembly of scholars, with the elbow room which the Department demands for them, it is certainly no small establishment. The organisation of a Bazaar on such a scale must have involved a great deal of work, physical and mental, and the employment of a considerable amount of time on the part of those who were charged with it’s flotation and arrangement. The executive committee who were so successfully active in the promotion of the event were as follows :- Colonel Horne, the Captain of the club was convenor, Mr T.W. Faichney, Commercial Bank, Wick, treasurer, and Mrs Horne of Stirkoke and Dr Dick, 12 Sinclair Terrace, acted as joint secretaries.

The committee who aide those organisers – in chief were :- Mr Ball, Dr banks, Mr Barclay, Dr Cormack, Mr W. Dick, Mr W. Falconer, Mr C. Fletcher, Mr D.W. Georgeson, Mr S.H. Goudie, Mr D.W. Gunn, Mr J. Harper, Mr G.T. McKenzie, Mr A. Macmillan, Mr T.A. Meredith, Mr J.J. Robertson, Mr R.J. Sinclair, Mr J. Skinner, Sheriff Stuart, Mr M.E. Thomson, Mr R.S. Waters, Miss Dick, Mrs Duff Dunbar, Mrs Fetcher, Miss Henderson, Mrs Leith, Miss B. Sinclair, Miss Stuart.

In addition to these a special committee was appointed to establish and systematise the misical and theatrical entertainments and side shows. They were :- Mr Fletcher, Convenor, Mr A. Doull, Mr D.W. Gunn, Mr A. Macmillan, Mr T. Meredith, Mr J.J. Robertson, Mr R.J. Sinclair, Mr D.H. Wares.

The Objects of The Bazaar.

 

The need of funds, was of course, the reason that moved the golf club to get up the Bazaar. Extensive improvements which have recently been executed on the course have exhausted their coffers, which requires to be replenished before further development of the extended course can become practicable. Until a year ago or thereabout the course at Reiss, which consisted of nine holes, was kept up without outside aid and found sufficient for the immediate requirements of the club. For some years back, however, the members have recognised that it would be in the interests of the town and district to extend the course to eighteen holes, and maitain it in first class order, so as to attract summer visitors. The extension has already been carried out, and it is admitted that the course is now one of the most sporting in Scotland, and capable of being made one of the best, if sufficient funds can be raised. The new pavilion which has just been completed is one of the most commodious and handsome clubhouses in the north. Special attention has been given to Lady members. An excellent water supply has been laid on. The Bazaar has been organised for the purpose of defraying the expense of the above improvements.

 

The Opening Ceremony

 

The opening ceremony on Wednesday was performed by Her Grace the Duchess of Portland, who arrived by motor from Langwell, she reached the academy a few minutes after twelve, and Colonel Horne who presided immediately opened the formal part of the proceedings. The salerooms, whre a small platform was erected for the speakers, was crowded to overflowing with a fashionable gathering  of townspeople and many country friends.

Colonel Horne, in his introductory remarks, stated brifly what were the objects of the Bazaar. It had been organized, he said, by the Wick Golf Club, who though not entitled to claim patronage from royalty, had certainly a distinct claim to being ancient. It was established in 1870, and was therefore the oldest golf club north of  the Grampians. This Bazaar had been organised with the object of enabling the club to provide a first class course, mainly, he supposed, for their own use, but also as an attraction to those golf enthusiasts further south who were ever in the outlook for pastures new on which to enjoy their favourite pastime. The course had been extended from nine holes to eighteen holes, and a new pavilion had been built. The opening ceremonies of these new works had already been duly celebrated, and by Friday night they hoped to be in the position of celebrating the possession of the necessary funds to pay for them, and have in addition a good nest egg for future expenses. ( Applause ) Of all games, golf, continued Colonel Horne, had long held the reputation of being the most fascinating – fascinating to young and old alike. Personally he had also found it most aggravating ( Laughter ). Not only was golf a popular pastime in the present day, but it seemed to have been so in ancient times. It was recorded that in the year 1457, the game was so popular as to seriously interfere with the more important persuits of archery, and to cause the rulers of the realm to sound a note of alarm. If such was the case four and a half centuries ago, Colonel Horne asked, what could be the feelings now of the eminent Scotsman who  was endeavouring to raise from the wreck of the volunteers the full-rigged ship of the territorials  ( Laughter ) They had only to watch the tide of golf enthusiasts, said the speaker, to see that the flow was ever northward. Lossiemouth, Nairn, Dornoch, were full to overflowing. Brora was fast becoming to be the most popular resort in the north, and after that was bound to come Reiss, and finally the invasion of the quiet and somewhat antiquated village of Reay. ( Laughter ) Whether the facination of golf could overcome the fish loaded air of the Herringepolis was a matter which could only be determined by the course of events. It would not be the golf club’s fault if it didn’t ( Applause ) “ I have now the honour” continued Colonel Horne, “ to ask Her Grave the Duchess of Portland to declare the Bazaar open. To Caithnessians, Her Grace requires no introduction, and I am sure you will all accord her the hearty welcome she deserves, not only as the wife of our Lord Lieutenant, but for the trouble she has taken in coming here to-day to open this Bazaar” ( Applause ).

Her Grace, who in stepping forward to speak, was accorded a great ovation, said ;- It gives me the very greatest pleasure to visit Wick to-day to open this Bazaar, which has been organised to defray the expenses of the extensive improvements to your golf ground. I play golf a little myself – very badly ( Laughter ) – just enough to know the joys of the game, as well as it’s bitter disappointments – ( Laughter ) – and I can well realise what a pleasure this beautiful course and pavilion must be to the inhabitants of Wick and it’s visitors. As I see you have a very large programme of entertainments, I will not detain you any longer, but I hope you will help to make this Bazaar a success by buying liberally at the various stalls, and thus gladden the hearts of those kind stallholders who have worked so hard to make this Bazaar possible. I have now much pleasure in declaring the Bazaar open. ( Applause )

Colonel Henderson in proposing a vote of thanks to the Duchess, said she not only took an interest in the Wick gol club, but also entertained a warm interest in all that was for the welfare of the town and the country generally ( Applause ) He was sure they would all appreciate the honour if Her Grace should determine to play golf on their course at some future date. ( Applause ).

The company thereafter turned their attention to the stalls and business opened briskly.

 

Stallholders

 

There was a very large staff of stallholders, mostly Ladies of course, who canvassed their wares with a graceful persistency and charming enthusiasm that was irresistible to male visitors at least, while their ready tact and unflagging zeal was invariably successful in enlisting the custom of members of their own sex. The stallholders ans assistants were :- Work Stall No 1. – The misses Henderson of Bilbster ( Miss Henderson, convenor ) ; Mrs Henderson, Bellvue, Wick ; Mrs Horne of Stirkoke ; Miss Horne of Stirkoke . Assistants – Mrs Lindzee, Miss Horne, Misses Inglis, Miss Stewart.

Work Stall No II. – Mrs Duff Dunbar of Hempriggs ( Convenor ); Mrs Leith, Westerlea, Wick ; Mrs Robertson, Central U.F. Manse, Wick ;The Misses Robertson, Hartfield, Wick. Assistants – Mrs Rae, Mrs E.G. Buik, Mrs Georgeson, Mrs Robert Robertson, Mrs Farquharson, Mrs Dickie, Miss J. Bremner, Miss J. Robertson, Miss Simpson, Miss Gunn, Miss Kelly, Miss Leith, Miss E. Bruce, Miss King, Miss Farquharson, Miss D. Farquharson, Mrs Barclay, Miss Mowatt, and Mrs Mowatt.

Work Stall No III. – Mrs Fletcher, West Banks, Wick ( Convenor ) ; Mrs Andrew Bremner, Breadalbane Crescent ; Mrs Cormack, Sinclair Terrace ; Mrs Thomson, 9 Francis Street. Assistants  - Mrs G. Cormack, Mrs Wares, Mrs Waters, Mrs Gunn, Misses Sandison, Miss Taylor, Miss Williamson, Miss Simpson, Miss A. Falconer, Miss F. Leith, Miss W. Miller, Miss Beta Flett, Miss Wares, Miss Malcolm, Miss Mackenzie, Miss Hunter.

Work Stall No IV. – Miss Dick, Sinclair Terrace, Wick, ( convenor ); Mrs Ball, Smith Terrace ; Mrs Faichney, Thurso Street ; Mrs Harper, Argyle Square  ;Mrs Mackenzie, John O’ Groats. Assistants – Miss L. Sinclair, Miss G.D. Sinclair, Miss Corner, Miss Mackenzie, Mrs Kelly, Miss Sybil Corner, Miss Saundra Corner, Miss Madge Sinclair, Nurse Macgillivray, Miss Cameron, Miss Sutherland, Miss M. Nicolson, Miss Jean Trotter, Miss K. Mackenzie, Miss Gillie, Miss Harsburgh, Miss Isa Ball.

Flower Stall. – Miss Stuart, Stirkoke Lodge, Wick, and assistants – Mrs Stuart, Miss Forbes, Miss Chrissie Forbes, Miss Falconer, Miss Dora Falconer, Miss Campbell, Misses Rugg.

Refreshment Stall – Miss Sinclair, Union Street, Wick, ( Convenor ); Mrs Milligan, Dempster Street ; Miss Sandison, Waverly House ; Miss Skinner, Huddart Street. Assistants – Miss Nicol,Miss J. Corner, Miss Waters, Miss T. More, Miss Weir, Miss N. Harper, and Messrs Sawnston and Eastbrook.

Game Stall -  Sheriff Stuart, Stirkoke Lodge ( Convenor ); Dr Banks, Hartfield, Wick ; Mr Falconer, B.L. Bank, Wick . Assistants – Mr William Banks, Mr Geo. B. Graham, and Mr Jas. Campbell.

Confectionery Stall – Miss B.J. Sinclair and assistants – Miss B. Sandison, D. Skinner, J. Swanson and M. Nicoll.

Parcels and Left Luggage Stall – Mr R.S. Waters and Mr Andrew Sinclair, along with several assistants.

 

 

The Plan of the Bazaar.

 

The school was very gaily decorated for the auspicious event. Outside there was a fine display of bunting, while inside the rooms and lobbies were artistically adorned with flowers , plants, bannerettes, lanterns, &c. The first rooms upon entering were reserved for the confectionery and refreshment stalls. Here there were daily luncheons between one and three, and afternoon tea from four to six o’clock, a bevy of white robed damsels being over ready to wait with alacrity on the numerous customers who patronised their department. Branching off the west end lobby was the game stall, where to start with, there was what seemed an inexhaustible collection of pheasants, hares, rabbits &c. Next door from the game-vendors was the parcels and left luggage office, where goods were packed and orders booked for delivery at moderate charges. In a niche of this lobby was situated the band stand, where the Wick amateur orchestral society played selections at intervals. At the end of the lobby was one of the entrances to the sale rooms. These rooms were of course the centre to which the visitors gravitated.

Two rooms with an ever open door of communication were utilized for the Bazaar proper. The display of good here were truly magnificent. Articles of almost every description in hosiery and many other lines were temptingly set out, and sales were pushed with an earnestness which betrayed a sort of rivalry between the separate stallholders. From the east entrance to the school admission could be got to the refreshment rooms, the cloak room, sale rooms, and the small apartment occupied by the Gipsy Palmist, Madam Zingano, and to the

 

The Concerts

 

Each day there were concerts held in one of the rooms of the new wing of the school. On Wednesday afternoon the performers were Miss Mowat, Pianist, Miss stewart, Violinist, and Miss Madge Sinclair, Miss Maggie Nicolson and Mr Richard Ross, Vocalist. A rich programme finished with a clarionet duet by Messrs Craig.

On Wednesday evening the concert opened with Piano and Violin selections by Mr and Mrs Gilbertson. Miss Rita Cormack, Mrs Cormack, and Mr J.W. Gunn, Sibster, rendered solos, while Miss Chrissie Forbes gave a recitation, and Mr R. Mackay a flute solo.

Yesterday there was again a concert late in the afternoon, the artist engaged being Miss Mowat, who opened with some Pianoforte selections, Mr and Mrs Havelock, who sang a duet, and Mrs Faichney and Miss Trotter. The soloists were Miss Falconer and Mr R. Williamson, while Messrs Sym, Skinner, Gunn, and Kirkland gave some Violin selections.

Another concert takes place to-day at three O’Clock for which the following programmes has been arranged :- Piano selections, Miss Florrie Leith ; Miss M. Nicolson ; Recitation, Miss Chrissie Forbes ; Solo, Miss Rita Cormack ; Violin selections, Miss Stewart ; Solo, Mr Jas. W. Gunn.

The Theatricals

 

The amateur theatricals arranged by the Wick amateur dramatic society were most enjoyable features of the bazaar. There were two performances each day, first in the afternoon a comedietta in one act entitled “ Mem 7,” and in the evening a farcial sketch entitled “ Courting under difficulties.”

Orchestra

 

The members of the Wick amateur Orchestral society, who played selections at intervals in the course of the three days, were :-

Violins – Messrs Craig, Mackenzie, Troup, Mowat, Skinner, Sim, and Gilbertson.

Clarionet – Mr R.F. Craig

Flute – Mr R.Mackay

Cello – Mr D.W. Gunn

String Bass – Mr J. Scholey

Pianoforte – Mr W. Kirkland

Conductor – Mr J.J. Craig

Among their selections were the following :- The national wreath, No 8 ( Scotch ) ; Overture, “ The Caliph of Bagdad” ( Bouldieu ) ; “ The Joyful Peasant” ( Schumann ) ; Albions Wreath ( British Airs ) ; Waltz, “ Docirinen” ( Strauss ) ; Selection, “ Martha” ( Flotow ) ; March, “ Anchored” ; Minuet, Trio and Finale from Haydn’s Symphony in B Flat ; Waltz, “ Blue Danube” ( Strauss ) ; Overture, “ La Diademe” ( A. Herman ) ; National Wreath No 15 ( Scotch ) ; Wedding March ( Mendelssohn ) ; British Isles Military March ( Descriptive ) ;  Erin’s Wreath ( British Airs ) ; Selection, “ La Zigha Del Reggiments” ( Donizetti ) ; National Wreath No 19 ( Scotch ).

 

Other Amusements

 

A well supported entertainment of the bazaar was the various exhibitions given by Professor Johnson, the conjurer king, whose services the club acquired for the ocassion.

He gave a series of performances each day, presenting varied selections from his repertoire of magic – wonderful and laughable.

Madame Zingano, the gipsy palmist, also had a large circle of patrons, while the Punch and Judy Show, which was supposed to be specially designed for juveniles, nevertheless appealed to many who would not pass at half price, if children and adults were to be differentiated in the charges levied for admission. Out in the playground there were several games and competitions. The golf clock, naturally enough, was perhaps the popular favourite. A set of clubs and a bag are offered for this competition, and there is keen excitement over obtaining the possible.

The ever green Aunt Sallies had of course a circle of hard hitters, to whom this corner of the show was the all important feature of the Bazaar, while just a short distance away there was a novel shooting booth, where sportsmen could practice at all sorts of game fur and feather. The Morris Tube also had it’s devotees, who daily competed for a special prize.

An exciting and amusing entertainment was the great duck race, performed by eight model ducks in a tank of water in which the luckiest one won, and made his backer happy.

A fascinating game for members of both sexes was the American Hand Billiards, played on a sloping mahogany table, while no end of fun was extracted from the fortune-telling implements which were conveniently placed near the playground dyke.

From this description it may be gathered that the visitor was not likely to have many idle moments. Indeed, there was a fear at one time that the interest of the side shows took people away from the sale rooms, but this did not last all the time.

The club hope to realise something like £1000, and judging from the success of the two opening days, it does not look improbable that they will get it.

John O’ Groat Journal October 23rd 1908.

Golf

Mr C.W. Jervis Smith, the shooting tenant of Akergill Tower, recently presented the Wick Golf Club with several prizes for competition – two prizes for gentlemen and two for Ladies. The final in the gentlemens competition was played off on Saturday between Mr Norrice ( 6 ) and Mr Macmillan ( Scratch ), when Mr Norrice won by two up and one to play.In the Ladies competition, in a foursome the prize was won by Miss Horne, Stirkoke, and Colonel Henderson. The sheriff’s star and club, for play of 15 handicap and upwards, was also decided on Saturday. Mr Peter Sinclair winning with a gross score of 121 – 18 = 103. In the final for Smith prizes, the game stood all square at the 16th green, where the scratch man was unfortunate in getting an unplayable ball off his drive, and Mr Norrice winning the hole, and having a stroke at the next the game ended in his favour at the 17th green, being then two up and one to play.

John O’Groats Journal May 27th  1910

Golf

 

Reiss links are becoming more and more popular.  Each Saturday sees some fresh convert to the best of all outdoor  games, and the members of the Wick Golf Club are doing everything to make the course attractive for visitors who are devoted to the sport, and like a game on a course that is a sporting one.

The members of the Club, on Saturday made a commencement with the “Portland Club” competition, and the first round was played under ideal conditions. The following players qualified; C.H.Godwin, 79; George MacAdie, 85; John Gowans, 86; George Harrold, 87; C.J. Gilbertson, 88; Jas. Macraw, 89; t. Donaldson, 90; R. Bruce, 92; A. Doull, 92; John skinner, 93; W.G. Reid, 94; Jas. R. Forbes, 103; T. Turner, 111; R.G. Williamson, 112.

 

John O’Groats Journal June 10th 1910

Interesting Match

 

A match was played at Reiss Links last week between a team of Wick golfers and an equal number of officers from H.M.S. Furious.  The following is the result:-

Wick                                         H.M.S. Furious

Robert Bruce    0               Lt. Warrington Morris  1

T. Sinclair        1                Lt. Henson                   0

W. Dick           0                Lt. Williams                 0

T.W. Faichney 1               Staff-Paymaster sprigs  0

                        ---                                                   ---

                          2                                                     1

The officers have since written to the secretary of the Wick Golf Club thanking the members for the hospitality extended to them.

John O’Groat Journal June 17th 1910

Golf

 

There was a large attendance on the Reiss course last Saturday when the first round in the qualifying stage for the county cup was played.  The day was rather too warm to admit of record scoring.  The following were the best net scores George Banks, 82; t. Donaldson,82; J. Sim, 83; C.J. Gilbertson, 84; J. Gowans, 84; A.Bruce, 85; G. McAdie, 85; D.J.Henry, 87; Dr Dick, 90; A. Doull, 90; T.W. Faichney, 92; t. Sinclair, 92; Col. Henderson, 96; C. Fletcher, 96.

What became of the lady golfers last Saturday? We have seen quite a number of them battling with the wind and rain when there was little pleasure in being on the Links.  Last Saturday, however, there was a great calm.  The day was lovely.  Not a frock was to be seen.  Golf is a grand game so is tennis.

 

John O’Groats Journal June 24th  1910

Golf

 

The second match in the qualifying stage for the County Cup was played on the Reiss course on Saturday last.  Splendid weather favoured the play, and there was a slight following wind on the outward half.  The long spell of dry weather had, however, so blistered the surface of the putting greens that there was a considerable element of chance in getting the ball into the hole.  The following are the best scores in the two qualifying matches.

J.Sim                             83      74-157

R.Bruce                         85      82-167

T.Donaldson                  82      85-167

G.Banks                         82      89-171

G.Macadie                     85       88-173

T.Sinclair                       92       82-174

C.J.Gilbertson                84       92-176

J.Gowans                        84       92-176

W.D.Barclay                   85       91-176

T.W.Faichney                 92       84-176

The first eight will finish the competition by match play on dates to be afterwards fixed.

 

John O’Groats Journal July 1st 1910

Golf

 

We asked a golfing friend whether we should, in our notes this week, give first place to the open championship at St Andrews or to the monthly match of the Wick Club, and he unhesitatingly gave his verdict in favour of the latter.  We bow to his superior wisdom.

The monthly match of the Wick club was played at Reiss on Saturday last.  There was a very fair attendance of golfers, notwithstanding the unfavourable weather.  A strong side wind prevented low scoring.  Mr J. Sim was the winner of the match with a net score of 81.  Mr R. Bruce was second with 84.  Other good scores were Geo. Banks, 85; Wm. Miller, 88; John Gowans, 89; D.J. Henry, 89; G. Macadie, 89; T.Donaldson, 94.

 

John O’Groats Journal August 26th 1910

Golf

The Caithness Championship

 

The final for the County Cup was played on the Reiss Links on Saturday resulting in a win for Mr J. Gowans.  In the semi-final in the previous week Mr Gowans met Mr George Banks, to whom he conceded two strokes, and beat him by five up and four to play. His opponent on Saturday was Mr J. Sim, who had a bye and had an advantage of five strokes.  The match ended in a win for Mr Gowans by four up and two to go.  This is the second occasion on which Mr Gowans has won the cup.

John O’ Groat Journal April 21st 1911

Wick Golf Club.

 

Last Season’s Prize Winners.

 

The following is a list of last years prize winners submitted at the annual general meeting held last week :-

Monthly Competition Winners – April, Mr James McRaw ; May, Mr J. Sim ; June, Mr J. Sim ; July, Mr J. Sim ; August, Mr D. Durran ; Sepember, Mr R. Bruce ; October, Mr D. Durran ; November, Mr J. Gowans ; January, Mr Alex Cormack ; March, Mr D. Durran. Winner of the Captains gold medal for five best scores – Mr D. Durran. Winner of Mr Bruce’s prize for second class players – Mr George McAdie.

Bilbster Trophy – April, Mr Jas McRaw ; May, Mr J. Sim ; June, Mr R. Bruce ; July, Mr D. Durran ; August, Mr A. Doull ; September, Mr R.J. Sinclair ; October, Mr C.J. Gilbertson ; November, Mr J. Gowans. Holder of trophy for the year – Mr D. Durran.

Spring Meeting – Mr C.J. Gilbertson, Scratch medal and a club ; Mr Jas McRaw, A club ; Mr George Macadie, A club ; Mr W.G. Reid, Two Balls ; Mr J.R. Forbes, Two Balls ; Mr C.H. Godwin, One Ball.

Autumn Meeting – Mr D. Durran, Scratch medal and a club ; Mr A. Sinclair, Handicap Medal and a club ; Dr Banks, Two Golf Balls ; Mr J. Gowans, Two Golf Balls ; Mt T.W. Faichney, One Golf Ball ;Mr W. Miller, A Club.

County Cup Competition – Holder, Mr J. Gowans.

His Grace the Duke of Portland Cup – Holder, Mr C.J. Gilbertson.

Championship Competition – Winner of Dr Banks Medal, ( Not yet completed )

New Years Day Bogey Competition – Winners, Mr George Banks and Mr J. Ritchie.

 

John O’ Groat Journal April 28th 1911.

Professional record for Wick Golf Course.

 

The professional record for Wick golf course was reduced yesterday by Mr Tom Jamieson, the ground professional to 69. His card read :-

 

Out ….. 4,4,3,3,5,4,3,5,3 – 34

 In  …... 4,3,4,6,3,3,3,5,4 – 35

The previous record was 72 by the same player.

John O’ Groat Journal May 5th 1911

Wick Golf Club’s Monthly Medal.

 

Everything points to Wick Golf Club having a most successful season this year. Already the attendance of members at Reiss Links is most encouraging.

On Saturday the monthly medal competition and qualifying round in the Bilbster Trophy took place. Owing to a tricky wind good scoring was made extremely difficult. The medal was won by John Gowans, with a score of 94 less 12 –82. Other good scores were :-

 

D.J. Miller …………….  101 less 18 – 83

T.W. Faichney ……….     98 less 14 -  84

Robert Bruce …………    96 less  11 – 85

John Skinner ………….  106 less  20 – 86

W.G. Reid ……………   103 less  18 – 87

R.J. Sinclair ………….   100 less  12 -  88

D. Durran  …………..       93 less  5 -   88

George Mcadie ……..      106 less 18 – 88

J. Sim ………………..     108 less 16 – 92

The Spring meeting for the scratch medal, the Sheriff’s Star, and other prizes will take place on Saturday 13th May. On the same day the first qualifying round in the Duke of Portland’s cup is to be played.

John O’ Groat Journal May 12th 1911

Wick’s Lady Golfers.

 

Wick has her Lady golfers. With the lovely weather of the past few days large numbers of them have cycled to the course and joined in the healthy pastime. And several of them can play a very good game too. Since a distinct branch has been instituted in the club for Ladies, the game has been more freely patronised than ever, and on a day of fine sunshine it is really a most attractive sight to see them dotted over the course in their bright summer dresses.

The annual meeting of the Ladies belonging to Wick Golf Club was held recently, and was presided over by Colonel J.H. Henderson, the popular captain of the club. Last years fixture card with some slight alterations was adopted for the current year. The following sub-committee’s were appointed to arrange the matches, &c. – Misses M. Doull, E. Sandison, B. Sinclair, and B. Sutherland, along with the captain, vice captain and secretary of the club.

The Jervis Smith trophy competed for in May last was won by Miss M. Jamieson, the runner up being Miss N. Robertson.

The same trophy competed for in October was won by Miss M.L. Gunn, the runner up being Miss M. Jamieson. The monthly competitions held during the summer were won by Misses N. Robertson, M. Jamieson, B. Sandison, B. Sutherland, M.L. Gunn, and M. Jamieson. Miss B. Sutherland won the club competed for in September, Miss B. Sandison being the runner up.

John O’ Groat Journal June 2nd 1911.

Golf

Wick Golf Club’s Spring Meeting

 

One of the largest gathering of local golfers seen for some time was present at Reiss Links on Saturday week, there being over 70 playing on the course during the afternoon. The weather was beautifully fine, and the outing was most enjoyable. The ocassion was the spring meeting, for which there was a record entry, the number being 42. The following was the result :-

 

W.G. Reid  …………………………………….   86 less 16 – 70

George Harrold ……………………………….  107 less 29 – 78

J.W. Stonebanks ……………………………..    108 less 29 – 79

D. Durran …………………………………….     86 less 5    - 81

J.W. Davidson ……………………………….     95 less 14 -  81

R. Bruce ……………………………………..      93 less 11 -  82

J. Sim  ………………………………………..     93 less 16 -  82

E.G. Buik  ……………………………………    106 less 24 – 82

Other good scores were :-

A.M. Clark ……………………………………..   93 less 9  -   84

G.M. Joss  ………………………………………. 94 less 10 -  84

P. Sinclair  ……………………………………… 107 less 23 – 84

T. Turner  ……………………………………….  113 less 29 – 84

C.J. Gilbertson  …………………………………   96 less 11 -   85

D.W. Gunn  ……………………………………     104 less 19 – 85

J. Fraser  …………………………………………. 114 less 29 – 85

Col. Henderson  …………………………………   98 less 12  - 86

T.W. Faichney  ………………………………….  100 less 14 – 86

G.T. Mackenzie  ………………………………… 97 less 9 -     88

George Skinner  ………………………………… 100 less 12 -  88

George Banks  …………………………………..  101 less 13 – 88

A. Cormack  …………………………………….. 106 less 18 - 88

G.A.O. Green  …………………………………..  112 less 24 – 88

Chas. Fletcher  …………………………………    103 less 14 – 89

J. Gowans  ………………………………………   102 less 12 – 90

George Macadie …………………………………  108 less 18 – 90

D.S. Miller ………………………………………  119 less 29 – 90

J. Waters  ……………………………………….    119 less 29 – 90

 

Bilbster Trophy, Qualifying Stage

 

Mr Charles Fletcher was the winner in the monthky competition in the qualifying stage for the Bilbster Trophy on Saturday. Scores :-

 

Charles Fletcher  ……………………………………  92 less 14 -  78

A.M. Clark  ………………………………………… 89 less 9 -    80

Col. Henderson  ……………………………………  92 less 12 -  80

P. Sinclair  ………………………………………… 103 less 23 – 80

George Harrold  …………………………………..   110 less 29 – 81

John Gowans  ……………………………………..   95 less 12 -   83

Robert Bruce  …………………………………….    94 less 11 – 83

D. Durran  ………………………………………..    89 less 5 -    84

G.T. Mackenzie  …………………………………    94 less 9 – 85

J.W. Davidson  ……………………………………  99 less 14 -  85

T.W. Faichney  …………………………………… 100 less 14 – 86

J. McRaw  ………………………………………..   105 less 19 – 86

D.J. Miller  ………………………………………..  104 less 18 – 86

W.G. Reid  ………………………………………..  103 less 16 – 87

D.S. Miller  ……………………………………….  117 less 29 – 88

W. Dick  …………………………………………..  103 less 14 – 89

George Macadie …………………………………..  107 less 18 – 89

E.G. Buik …………………………………………. 113 less 24 – 89

 

Play will take place to-morrow ( Saturday ) in the Duke of Portland’s Cup Competition.

Bignold Park Golf Course

 

At the town council meeting on Monday night the parks committee reported that they had resolved to lay out the Bignold Park as a practising golf course, and to get Mr Tom Jamieson, the professional at Reiss Links, to advise them as to the carrying out of the work. The work had been remitted to councillor Davidson and Mr Jamieson. Mr Jamieson, who has a wide experience of golf courses and the game generally, considers the park a splendid one for the purpose. The cost, he estimates, will not be more than £5. It is expected that the course will be ready for play at an early date.

John O’ Groat Journal June 9th 1911

Golf Portland Cup – Qualifying Stage

 

Another splendid day’s golf was enjoyed at Reiss Links on Saturday, when the qualifying stage by medal ( Handicap ) play for the Portland Cup was the chief item on the programme. As a result of the Day’s play, the following eight members will now compete for the cup by match play :-

 

W.G. Reid  …………………………. 70 plus 87 = 157

J.W. Davidson ……………………… 81 plus 78 = 159

Geo. Harrold ……………………….  78 plus 81 =  159

A.M. Clark  ………………………..   84 plus 80 = 164

Col. J.H. Henderson  ………………. 86 plus 78  = 164

Peter Sinclair  ……………………… 84 plus 80 =  164

D. Durran   …………………………  81 plus 84 = 165

R. Bruce  …………………………..   82 plus 83 = 165

 

The above players have noe been drawn against each other as follows, and will meet on the links to-morrow :-

 

Peter Sinclair V Robert Bruce

D. Durran V A.M. Clark

Geo. Harrold V  W.G. Reid

Col. Henderson V  J.W. Davidson

 

Jervis Smith Trophy

 

The lady members of the Wick club also have their trophy. The Jervis Smith Competition, which is a half yearly one, is being more keenly contested for than ever. The final for the past half year takes place to-morrow between Miss Mary Jamieson and Miss N. Henderson.

 

John O’ Groat Journal June 16th 1911

Golf.

 

The Wick golf club has decided to throw the Reiss course open to all who care to go and enjoy a game of golf on Coronation Day. In the afternoon mixed foursomes, driving, pitching, and putting competitions will be held. During the afternoon music will be discoursed in the pavilion. It is proposed to conclude the programme with midnight golf if the weather conditions are favourable.

Portland Cup Competition

 

Last week we published the ties drawn for the final in the Portland Cup Competition and the following is the result of the play :-

 

R. Bruce beat P. Sinclair by 5 and 3

A.M. Clark and D. Durran tied

W.G. Reid beat George Harrold by 4 and 3

Col. J.H. Henderson and J.W. Davidson tied.

Mr Clark and Mr Durran in replaying again drew, but in the third set-to Mr Durran won by 4 and 3.

Colonel Henderson and Mr Davidson replayed on Monday when a tie again resulted. A third meeting took place yesterday, when the Colonel beat Mr Davidson by 2 holes.

The semi final will be played at an early date when the contestants will be Mr D. Durran and Mr Bruce, and Colonel Henderson and Mr W.G. Reid.

 

Jervis Smith Trophy

 

Miss M. Jamieson beat Miss N. Henderson in the final of the Jervis Smith Trophy. This is the second ocassion the trophy has been won by Miss Jamieson.

 

John O’ Groat Journal June 23rd 1911

Golf

Wick V Brora

 

Brora has a fine set of golfers. That was the unanimous verdict of the Wick players at the conclusion of the match played at Reiss on Saturday between teams representative of the two towns. They are nearly all young, agile and strong, and, provided they remain intact, they should give a good account of themselves against any team in the north of Scotland. The weather was not all that could be desired, a strong wind blowing with intermittent showers of rain. Despite this fact, however, the game was vigorously entered on, and after a keen contest Brora emerged winners by 9 games to six – one game being halved. Scores :-

 

                                          Brora                                                      Wick

 

J.G. Edwards  ………………………… 0      W.H. Allan ……………………….. 1

R. Edwards …………………………..  1       D. Durran  ………………………..  0

A.W. Kidd  …………………………    0       G.T. Mackenzie  …………………  0

W. Cromb  …………………………    1        A.M. Clark  ……………………… 0

W. Keith  ……………………………. 1       G.M. Joss  ………………………..  0

A.N. Other  ………………………….  1       R. Bruce …………………………  0

G. Donaldson ……………………….  1        Col. Henderson  ………………… 0

W. Macauley  ……………………….  1        J. Gowans  ………………………  0

J. Kidd ………………………………. 1        J.W. Davidson  …………………. 0

W. Edwards ………………………… 0         Geo. Skinner  …………………… 1

Alex Grant  ………………………… 0          Chas. Fletcher ………………….. 1

W. Campbell  ………………………  1         W.G. Reid ……………………… 0

T. Morris  …………………………    0          Dr Banks ………………………. 1

A. Sutherland  …………………….    0          W.D. Barclay ………………….  1

P. Stuart  ………………………….     1         A. Doull ………………………..  0

T.M. Hunter ………………………    0          C.G. Gilbertson  ……………….   1

 

  1.                                                                                                          6

Captain T.M. Hunter at the close, thanked the Wick club on behalf of the visitors for their courtesy and kindness. They had enjoyed the game, and now hoped that the Wick club would pay a visit to Brora. Colonel Henderson, in reply, congratulated the Brora players on their victory, and said that an endeavour would be made to journey to Sutherland for a return match.

 

John O’ Groat Journal November 3rd 1911

Golf

Monthly Competition at Reiss Links

 

There was a fair turnout of members of the Wick Golf Club at Reiss Links on Saturday to take part in the monthly competition. The weather was favourable and good play was witnessed. The winner of the medal for the month was Mr J. Waters, Mr D. Durran as runner up, the following are the pricipal scores :-

 

J. Waters  …………………………………..   108 less 29 – 79

D. Durran  ………………………………….   86 less 5 --    81

D. Houston  ………………………………..   101 less 18 -   83

W.G. Reid …………………………………   96 less 12 --   84

A.K. Miller ………………………………..   101 less 15  -  86

G.T. Mackenzie  …………………………     96 less 9 --    87

George Macadie …………………………     106 less 18 -  88

R. Bruce  …………………………………..   100 less 1 --  89

 

County Cup Final

 

The result of the final for the County Cup between Mr D.J. Miller and Mr J. McRaw was a win for the former by 3 and 2.

 

John O’ Groat Journal November 17th 1911

Golf

 

Autumn Competition

 

The tie between Mr George T. Mackenzie and Mr D.J. Miller for second and third prizes in the Autumn Competition was played at Reiss Links on Saturday afternoon, and resulted in Mr D.J. Miller winning the handicap medal with a score of 96 less 17 – 79. Mr Mackenzies score was 103 les 9 – 94. The first place ( scratch ) medal was taken by Mr D. Durran.

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