Forgotten Golfing Greens Of Scotland
 Forgotten Golfing Greens Of Scotland

Lybster, Black Parks.

Lybster

 

 First mention  1904.  Originally a 9-hole course on common known locally as Black Park.  The new Lybster Railway bisected the course and it was sparingly used.  A new 9 hole course, laid out by Chief Constable McHardy, was opened in 1904 on Reisgill Mains, land tenanted by Mr Burn, about half a mile from the town. 

The valley of the burn, where the golf course is laid out, is from one hundred and thirty yards to two hundred and fifty yards broad, and along the greater part of the course is bounded on either side by steeply sloping banks, mostly covered by whin bushes which in season present a most brilliant display of bright yellow and green.  The burn winds in a serpentine form through the broad level part of the valley , making it a thoroughly effective but not too difficult hazard. 

The configuration of the ground and the winding character of the banks combine to make the lower part of the course more romantic and varied than golf courses usually are.                                       

Being the latest formed of the Highland golf courses the excellence of the Lybster course is as yet unknown to visitors, but there is no doubt that it will be increasingly appreciated.  The varied nature of the ground and the excellence of its turf  give it a character quite its own.  It still requires the expenditure of some money to smooth the rough places, but the Committee of Management will make it their business to see to that as time and their means afford."  (GI 7.7 05)

The course is two miles long with a Bogey of 44(WWG).  Membership 20.  Last recorded 1913.

 

Article from 'Golf Illustrated', July 1905

Golf in the North - Lybster Golf Club, Caithness

Formerly, lovers of the health giving game of golf in the Lybster district were contented with a very limited and indifferent course laid out on a piece of common locally known as the Black Park. The line of the new Lybster Railway, which was laid through the ground, bisected the golf course, and play was afterwards confined to a few ardent players who thought that a game on any kind or size of course was better than no game at all.

Last winter the circle of players was augmented by the accession of Mr G M Joss, the new agent of the Town and County Bank at Lybster, who had formerly been an enthusiastic member of the Wick Club, and who is undoubtedly one of the best players in the county. Through his agency a fine new course of nine holes has been laid out about half a mile from Lybster on ground kindly granted free of rent by Mr Burn, the lessee of Reisgill Mains. A regular club has been formed with Mr Burn (who is resident in India) as honorary captain, Mr Joss as captain and Mr Cranna as secretary.

The valley of the burn, where the golf course is laid out, is from one hundred and fifty yards to two hundred and fifty yards broad, and along the greater part of the course is bounded on either side by steeply sloping banks, mostly covered with whin bushes, which at this season present a most brilliant display of bright yellow and green. The burn winds in a serpentine form through the broad level part of the valley, making a thoroughly effective but not too difficult hazard.

The configuration of the ground and the winding character of the banks combine to make the lower half of the course more romantic and varied than golf courses usually are.

Being the latest formed of the Highland golf courses the excellence of the Lybster course is as yet quite unknown to visitors, but there is no doubt it will be increasingly appreciated. The varied nature of the ground and the excellence of its turf give it a character quite its own. It still requires the expenditure of some money to smooth the rough places, but the committee of management will make it their business to see to that as time and their means will afford.

The air of the east coast of Caithness, and especially of the parish of Latheron, is simply charming in summer and autumn. The rainfall is light and there are but few days in a normal season on which the player cannot enjoy his game. Good and cheap accommodation is to be had at the hotels of the village of Lybster, within a short walk of the first tee.

Golf Illustrated, 7th July 1905

Lybster Golf

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