Forgotten Golfing Greens Of Scotland
 Forgotten Golfing Greens Of Scotland

Inverallochy

Inverallochy ( Aberdeenshire ) .from golfing annual 1889

Invrallochy Golf Club.

An ex-office-bearer writes :

"

Golf, which is a favourite pastime in this locality, and which has been played for generations on the Links of Inverallochy, has, I am sorry to say, been put a stop to by the proprietor, owing to complaints by the farmers who individually share a part of the links. The fishermen, unfortunately, have not been able, from want of funds, to take the case before the Law  Courts,where, owing to the length of time the game has been played on the links, the verdict would assuredly be in their favour."

“Regular challenge matches were played throughout the 1800s against local rivals Inverallochy/Cairnbulg and inter club matches are documented between Fraserburgh and Peterhead in the 1850s.” (FGC History)

 

“There has been a proper golf course at Inverallochy since 1888 but there was almost certainly a few holes of sorts on the site of the current course in existance by the 1850s. Cairnbulg also had a couple of holes at this time that lay in the area that lies behind their harbour.” (IGC Website)

Inverallochy golf club

 

Before the formation

 

Aberdeen Journal March 26th, 1883.

Fraserburgh

 

A match was played on Friday between a portion of the Fraserburgh golf club and a number of Inverallochy golfers, resulting in a decided victory for the former. Thirteen couples started, and after playing 18 holes and comparing cards, it was found that Fraserburgh had won by 47 holes, the score being – Fraserburgh 55, Inverallochy 8.

Aberdeen Peoples Journal November 15th, 1884

 

Formation Of Club

 

A golf club has been formed here under the name of the White Link Golf Club. Office bearers have been appointed, and the match days fixed are – Handicap Medal, second Saturday of each month ; Scratch Medal – Last Saturday of each month.

Fraserburgh Herald February 18th, 1896

Inverallochy Golf Club

 

Exhibition Match

 

Robbie Mearns, one of the professionals of the Aberdeen club, visited Inverallochy on Saturday, and gave an exhibition game under the auspices of the local club. In the forenoon Mearns was a partner in a foursome, and was accompanied by a very large following. In the afternoon he played the best of the two balls of two local cracks, and won by three holes. His playing was much admired by all. Especially his deadly iron play, which was the theme of general admiration. His score was 75, which, of course, forms the record for the course.

Fraserburgh Herald and Northern Counties Advertiser March 3rd, 1896

Golf Match

 

Inverallochy G.C. Beats Fraserburgh G.C.

 

A match took place over the course on Wednesday between representatives of the Fraserburgh and Inverallochy clubs. The day was good, and an excellent game resulted. The match was entered upon with much enthusiasm, and in the villages much interest was taken in the contest. The course, which has only recently been laid off, is a most excellent one. The turf is remarkably fine, and many of the greens are beautifully true. The game was keenly contested, and greatly enjoyed, the strangers especially enjoying the new course. The match resulted in a win for Inverallochy by 19 holes. The best cards handed in were – Mr Ross and Mr William Smith, 82 ; Mr Wm. Stephen, 83 ; and Mr Cranns, 84. The strangers were, after the match, most hospitably entertained by Mrs Dundas, Schoolhouse, and Mrs Alex Whyte, Frederick Street. The following are the scores :-

 

                         Inverallochy                                                          Fraserburgh

                               Holes                                                                     Holes

  1. Whyte …..   ……  ……   5                         Methven Ritchie …….   …..  ..   0

W. Stephen ….    …….    …. 1                         R. Mutch  ……..   ……  ……..   0

W. Smith  …………  ….  ….0                         J.A. Ross  …….  …….  …  …..  1

A. Stephen  ………..  ……..  1                        A. Mitchell  ……..  ….. ……….. 0

R. Stephen  …………  …. …2                        J. Milne ……..  ……. ….  …….. 0

J. Cranna  ……..  ….  ……    4                        W. MacKenzie  …….  …..  …… 0

A. Ritchie   ………….  ……  1                        Rev. Mr Williamson  ….  ….   ..  0

J. Whyte  ……  ….  ……..     4                        J. Dunn  ………   ……  ………   0

A. Ritchie  …….. ….  ……..  3                        Dr Dingwall  ……  …………      0

W. Whyte   ………………… 0                        C. Stevenson  ………..  ………   0

A. Strachan  ………  …..  … 0                         L. R. McAllan  …….   …….. ..   6

A. Ritchie  …….. .. …… ….  0                        P. Davidson  ….. …… ………..  2

W. Ritchie   ………..  ……..  7                        A. Sinclair  ……..  ……..  ….. .. 0

C. Duthie  ………  ……  …   0                        J. Buchan   ……….  ….. ….. ..    2

A. Buchan  ……….  ……….  2                       S. Batchman  ….. ………   …..    4

J. Strachan   …….. ….. ……. 0                        W. Grant  …….  …. …………..  1

                                              ____                                                                         __

                                                 30                                                                          15

 

Fraserburgh Herald March 17th, 1896

Golf

Fraserburgh V Inverallochy

 

The return match between these clubs was played on the Corbiehill greens on Saturday afternoon when Fraserburgh managed to reverse the result of the first encounter between the teams. In the match at Inverallochy Fraserburgh was 19 down ; on this occasion, Fraserburgh was 49 up. The weather was seasonable, although very cold, and in every way conducive to good play. Some good cards were handed in, the best of which being those produced :- R. Mutch, 84 ; Wm. Stephen, Inverallochy, 85 ; Rev. G. Wauchope Stewart, 86 ; and Dr Dingwall, 86. After the match the teams dined in the Fraserburgh Café, the strangers being the guests of the Fraserburgh club. Dr Dingwall presided and proposed prosperity to the Inverallochy golf club. Mr Dundas replied. A pleasant hour was spent. The details of the scores are as follows :-

 

                      Fraserburgh                                                         Inverallochy

  1. Mitchell  …………………  0                    A. Stephen  ……………………  0

R. Mutch  ………….  ………  2                   W. Stephen  ………………  …..  0

Jas. Milne  …….  ………  …..  0                   R. Stephen  ………..  ….  …….. 0

Rev. M. Williamson  ……..  ..   5                    A. Whyte  ….  ……..  …..   ….   0

Dr Dingwall  ………  ……….. 9                    A. Ritchie  …………………….  0

Peter Noble  ……..   ………     0                   Jas. Whyte  …………  ……..       1 

Chas. Stevenson  …………  ..   0                    Wm. Whyte  ………..  ….  …… 7

Rev. G.W. Stewart  ………….. 14                  A. Buchan  …………  …..  …..   0

      I.Sinclair  ………..  ……..         0                   D.C. Dundas …. …………..  ..    0

      P. Davidson  ……….  ….  …..   6                   W. Ritchie  …….  ….  ………     0

      Geo. Milne  ……  ……………. 6                    A. Buchan  ………………….     0

       L. McAllan  ………………  ..   0                    John Duthie  …..  ………..  ….. 5

      W. Noble Jnr  ……………..       7                     And. Ritchie  ……………….     0

      Jas. Buchan  ………..  ………   6                     Geo. Buchan  ……..  … …….   0

      Wm. Grant  ……………..  ….   7                     Jas. Strachan  ……….  … …… 0

                                                      ____                                                                    ____

                                                         62                                                                       13

Aberdeen Press and Journal May 1st, 1899

 

Inverallochy golf club

_____________

 

Presentation of cup by Mrs

Mackenzie Fraser

 

This club has just been presented by Mrs Mackenzie Fraser of Castle Fraser and Inverallochy with a massive and valuable silver challenge cup for competition amongst the members.

The cup has been named the “ Mackenzie Fraser Golf Challenge Cup,” in memory of the late Col. F. Mackenzie Fraser, who was the Hon. Captain and liberal patron of the club. The cup will be played for annually under handicap conditions.

Mrs Mackenzie Fraser is Hon. Patroness of the club. The handsome trophy is now on view at Mr Whyte’s, general merchant, Inverallochy.

Peterhead Sentinel and Buchan Advertiser, July 14th, 1900

 

Vandalism

 

Malicious Michief : Half a dozen of the holes on Invrallochy golf course have again been interfered with, and the police are investigating the matter. The holes damaged are those in proximity to the farms of Hallmoss and Bankhead, the flags having been removed and the ground covered with filth.

Scotsman February 26th, 1901

 

Inverallochy and Aberdeen Victory

 

More than usual interest attached to the match which was played over the links course at Aberdeen on Saturday between the Inverallochy club and The Victoria club. The Inverallochy club is composed almost entirely of fishermen, and when one remembers that it is only in the brief intervals that occur between the herring and white fishing seasons that the members can obtain practice, it must be admitted they have made rapid strides in the period within which they have taken up the game. Already they have constituted themselves one of the strongest clubs North of Aberdeen. Saturday’s was the first match between them and any of the Aberdeen clubs, but it may be taken for granted that now Inverallochy have demonstrated themselves worthy foemen – their defeat by 21 holes was really a creditable defeat – there will be frequent goings and comings between them and the city golfers.

 

Peterhead Sentinel March 2nd, 1901

Golf

Inverallochy players At Aberdeen

 

The first of what is hoped will be an annual series of matches between the Aberdeen Victoria club and the Inverallochy clyb was played on Saturday with thirty men a side over the Aberdeen links. A troublesome wind blew over the course from the North West, but the greens were in fairly good order for the season. The match resulted in a victory for the home players by 59 holes to 38, giving them a majority of 21 holes. At the close of the match the Inverallochy players were entertained in the Victoria clubhouse. The return match will be played on the last Saturday of this month. The following were the scores :-

 

Inverallochy                              Holes                            Victoria                              Holes

 

Alex. Ritchie  …….   …….          0                    James Innes  …………   ……….       5

Alex. Whyte   ……………..         0                    Lewis Anderson  …………  ………  1

William Whyte  …………..         1                     C.L. Beattie  ………………………  0

William Stephen  ……………… 0                     A. Cospor   …………………………2

Charles Stephen  ………………  0                     James Milne  ……………………… 1

John E. Buchan  ………  ……… 0                     William Hendry  ………..   ………. 1

James L. Stephen  ……………..  0                     J.A. McHardy  ……………………. .3

Alex. Ritchie  ( Sang ) ………… 0                     I.B. Robb  ………….   ……………  6

James Buchan  ……….  ………. 3                      E. Legge  ………………………….. 0

Geo. Stephen  ………  ………… 0                     A.S. Balneaves  …………………… 1

Andrew C. Buchan  …………… 0                      P. Smith  …………………………..  4

Robert Masson ………………..   2                      M.H. Mackie  …………………….  0

James Whyte  ……………..  ….  5                     T. Donald  …………………………  0

A. Strachan  …………………..    1                     T. Chrighton   ……………………..  0

Robert Ritchie  ………………..   4                      Neil Shaw  …………………..  ….   0

George Buchan  ………………..  6                     T.H. Donald  ………………………  0

Alexander Buchan  …………….  3                     R. McAskill  ………………………  0

Robert Stephen  ………………... 1                      E. Bisset  ………………………….  0

William Stephen  ………………  1                      J.A. Ross ………………………….   0

Alexander Duthie  ……………    5                      D. Walker  ……………..  ………      0

Andrew Whyte   ………………..  0                     J.W. Henderson  ………………….    6

H. Drummond  ………………..    0                     D. Christie  ………………………     4

Pat Whyte  ……………………..  0                      W.H. Reid  ……………………….    5

Andrew Stephen  ……………….. 0                     George Chalmers  ……………….    11

Pat Ritchie  …………………….. 0                      Wm. McKay  …………………….    1

Andrew May  …………………..  0                      C.E. Smith  ………………………   5

Alex. Ritchie  …………………..  0                      W.L.Marr  ……………………..       2

Andrew Masson  ……………….  4                       A. Paton  …………………..  ….     0

John M. Ritchie  ………………..  2                      D.J. Innes  ……………………….   0

C. Duthie   ……………………… 0                      J.L. Shepherd  ……………………. 1

                                                _____                                                                              ____

                                                    38                                                                                  59

                                __________________________________________________

 

Fraserburgh Herald March 26th, 1901

Inverallochy

Golf Exhibition Game

 

On Saturday last the links had a most animated appearance, the occasion being a visit of the Balgownie professional, Archie Simpson. The weather was idea and the course in capital condition. In the forenoon Archie tackled the best ball of Messrs Alex Ritchie ( Skeel ) and W. Whyte. The “ Pro” began in sensational style by pocketing the first hole in 2, and by dashing play covered the first nine holes in 35. Up to this time the amateurs had not taken a hole, but halving four. Coming in, Archie fell away somewhat, having seven 5s and two 4s, taking 43 home. His 78 was made up as follows :- Out 2,5,4,4,5,4,3,4,4 ; In, 5,5,5,5,5,4,4,5,5. Mr Ritchie gave a capital account of himself being only one hole down at the end with Archie. Coming home Ritchie, by really fine golf, took 5 holes from the pro, and finished with a very good 80. Mr Whyte also played well, especially in the home coming, covering the last nine holes in 39, and totalling a good 82. The result was a drawn game. In the afternoon Archie again faced the best ball of Messrs Alex Whyte and J.C. Buchan. The pro again went off in good form. Covering the first half in 37 and leading the amateurs by two holes.

He unfortunately took 6 to the short hole which is 2 or 3 above par play. Mr Whyte was at his best and had 38 for the same half. Archie maintained his good form in the second half and had 38, giving him 75 for the round.

Mr Whyte got into difficulties at the last two holes, getting 6 at each, and had 42 for the half this giving him a total of 80 for the round. Mr Buchan had 89, and was somewhat off his usual good form. The pro finished 3 holes up. Archies play was much admired, his driving being very dashing. The natural greens puzzled him a good deal and he missed a good many short putts. There was an immense crowd, several hundreds following on both occasions.

The Victoria, Aberdeen, play the local club at Inverallochy on Saturday next the concluding stage of a home and home match.

Aberdeen Press and Journal February 26th, 1902

 

Mr Maconachie M.P. Has presented the Inverallochy golf club with a very handsome silver cup, to be competed for among the members.

The Tatler ( Below ) No 95, April 22nd, 1903.    Text written for Inverallochy only.

 

The Inverallochy golfers at the Royal Burgess in 1903

 

Last summer a wandering journalist discovered a kind of Aboriginal settlement of golfers at Inverallochy, a little fishing village in the North-East coast of Scotland. The inhabitants are entirley fisher folk, and it appeared that the male population when not engaged at the herring fishing were in the habit of playing golf from morning to night on a very good natural links adjoining the village.

Whether the fishermen of Inverallochy have been golfers for generations or whether they have only fallen victim to the baciluss of golf in the last year or two has not transpired, but it is a remarkable testimony to their sporting enthusiasm that they should have started to play golf as it were " on their own" without the lead of any local club to follow and without any good players on whom to model their style and excite their emulation.

It is further remarkable that with all these disadvantages the fishermen have attained such proficiency as to justify their receiving invitations from several well-known Scots clubs to friendly matches.

An Inverallochy team have lately completed a tour in which they played the Bonaccord club of Aberdeen, The Edinburgh Burgess Club, and the Royal Musselburgh. They won at Aberdeen but were defeated in the other two matches pretty heavily. All who have seen them play, however, agree that the fishermen play a wonderful game and that with a little more experience of longer courses they will be a match for most clubs.

 

 The photo in the Tatler article below shows the Inverallochy golfers at the entrance to the Burgess clubhouse.

Aberdeen Journal, March 3rd, 1905

Letter

 

Inverallochy Golf Club V The Commons

 

In reply to a communication in connection with the match Which Mr A.W. Maconochie has arranged between the house of commons and the Inverallochy Golf Club, the secretary of the fishermen’s club yesterday received the following telegram from Mr Maconochie, who is at present in London :-

“ To Adam Ritchie, Inverallochy, Aberdeenshire

“ Glad to say that Sir Henry Seton Karr is very pleased with the idea of trying to arrange for 25th March. He would prefer, if convenient for your team, April, as the days are then longer and the weather better.    Writing fully

                                         “ Maconochie”

The teams will probably number 20 players a side. Mr Maconochie, with his usual liberality, has offered to defray the expenses of the fishermen.

 

Dundee Courier, March 31st, 1905

 

Fishermen V  M.P.s

The Inverallochy Golf Club

______________

Its Rise And Reputation

___________

( Special to the Courier )

 

The unique golf match which has been arranged by Mr A.W. Maconochie, M.P. for East Aberdeenshire, in which Buchan constituency lie in the fishing village of Inverallochy and Cairbulg, a few miles South of Fraserburgh is to take place to-morrow.

 

Cocks o the North

These fishermen have of late years come prominently to the front, and have asserted their supremacy over all corners in the North.

Golf has been played over the Inverallochy links more or less for the last fifty years, some of the men having witnessed the game at St Andrews and other East Coast fishing centres. But the present club dates back only for the last twenty years or so, and has been conducted on lines strictly in accordance with the recognised St Andrews rules

Mr D.C. Dundas, schoolmaster, ( a native of Dundee, and a well-known cricketer in Forfarshire for many years ) has been Captain of the club all along, and he was instrumental two years ago in having his men taken to Edinburgh and Musselburgh to play the Royal Burgess and Musselburgh clubs, in which undertaking the fishermen, although not actual winners in their big venture, made a wonderfully creditable appearance against such cracks as Messrs. A.M. Ross, Angus Macdonald, and J.M. Williamson.

 

Their Rise To Fame

The club sprang into fame some five years ago, when, after summarily disposing of such County teams as Fraserburgh and Peterhead, they tackled the city teams in Aberdeen.

Their first engagement in Aberdeen was with the leading links club, the Victoria, when after a most exciting match, the fishermen were only about twenty holes down with sixty men in the field. In their next attempt with the same club at Aberdeen only seven holes was the margin. On both occasions when the Victoria men visited Whitelink, they received overwhelming defeats!. A great match was arranged between these two rivals on a neutral course at Cruden Bay a year ago, when in a big and selected field the fishermen emerged victors.

Impregnated With Golf

The village is impregnated with golf, the very youngest growing up almost with the club in their hands. These urchins may be seen at all times of the day driving at corks and other improvised balls with old and broken clubs of their sires. The boys at the school have a juvenile team, and play on a small course of their own bordering on the Whitelink course. These youngsters play with amazing accuracy and have the full swing in driving. At night amongst the fishermen the engrossing subject is golf, and keen criticism goes on as to the fortunes of the respective cracks in their home competitions. A certain section go in for football, and the local team take a high place in the district matches, holding their own quite well with the leading clubs in Fraserburgh and Peterhead. Altogether Inverallochy is unique in having such clubs, composed as they are of fishermen pure and simple, and the sea town in particular and the county in general may well be proud of these athletic “ toilers of the sea.”

Their Ambition

It is the ambition of these stalwarts to meet in the near future some of the well-known Southern combinations, as they are never better pleased than when pitted against “ foemen worthy of their steel.” The pity is that they are off play all the summer season, when away at the various fishings in Ireland, Shetland, and England. But up to end of April they are open for all comers, and it is to be hoped that next season they will secure engagements with a number of leading clubs both on the East and West Coasts. A tour for such a purpose has been talked of, but as yet has taken no practical shape. If such strong combinations as Carnoustie, St Andrews and the like would enter into negotiations for a visit of these notable players, a really representative team would willingly take the field.

Aberdeen Daily Journal April 3rd, 1905

 

The Inverallochy Golfers

At Sandwich

Fishermen beaten but delighted

 

                                                                    ( From our own correspondent )

                                                                            Sandwich, Saturday

 

It is impossible to deny that the Inverallochy team were badly beaten in the match they played at Sandwich to-day against a strong team of golfing members of the House Of Commons.

The fishermen won but two matches out of the eleven that were played, yet they declare the competition to be one of the most enjoyable in which they have ever taken part. From Tuesday morning onwards, which is the date of the fishermens return, ten, “ best” rooms in Inverallochy will be decorated each with the golf club that every member of the Parliamentary team presented to his opponent. George Buchan, whom his friends always address as “ Joe” – because, as they explain, it is short for George – carries home a brassy which on the shaft just below the grip bears in the Prime Minister’s handwriting, “ From A.J. Balfour, April 1905.” The other presentation clubs are similarly signed by the remaining nine members of the House Of Commons Team. Notwithstanding that the clubs come from Tom Vardons workshop, just opposite Sandwich golf course, they, - fine tools as they are – will be kept as family heirlooms. “ Aye, it’s a bonny stick.” Said one fisherman, “A bonnie stick ; but I’ll never strike a ba’ wi’ it. Ma forefathers never thocht fin they cesed tae play lick and lick aboot on Inverallochy links wi’ ae club amun the lot that we wid play wi’ the members o’ Parliament.

The morning broke beautifully bright over the town of Sandwich, which, in its leisureliness and lack of stir, is so marked a contrast to the busy city of London not 70 miles away. Sandwich is an ancient town and has carried into the present day much of the picturesqueness of the past. Its narrow streets wind hither and thither, and the first floor of houses overhang the pavements as they did hundreds of years ago in all English towns. Down by one of the ancient gateways, still guarded on either hand by the towers for archers, leant one of the representatives of Sandwich’s former power. As he leisurely smoked his pipe, his uniform – marked conspicuous with the words “ Toll Keeper” – and hoary head seemed to put him in strict keeping with his surroundings.

He cast his eye occasionally over the quay by one side of the sluggish river and the mooring posts and rusty winches that fringed the meadow on the other bank. In the afternoon his vigil was rewarded, and a two masted schooner and barge lay outside the gates of the town. They had somehow managed to slip up the four miles of windings and twists through which the waters of the Stour reach the sea. The sea has given Sandwich one of the finest golf courses in Britain, but it has taken from its maritime supremacy. When it was made one of the Cinque Ports chargeable with the naval defence of England, “ it was the most famous of all English harbours.” In its day it has seen the embarkation and debarkation of St Wilfrid Canute, Becket, and Couer de Lion. Under Edward 1V, it possessed 95 ships and 1500 mariners, but in the sixteenth century its harbour was silted up, and though, up to sixty years ago, its people tried to keep its port in a state for trade, the two miles of land that has been heaped up between it and the sea has proved an unsurmountable barrier.

The golf course lies by road about a mile and a half from the town of Sandwich. The clubhouse, sheltered by fine old trees, looks in the distance like some English farmhouse. When one is close to it, one finds it a rambling red brick, red tiled building, surrounded for the most part with velvety lawns. Some of the fishermen went out in the morning and played a few holes of the course, but they were all back again at the clubhouse by half-past ten. Most of the members of the Parliamentary team arrived by motor from different parts of Kent. It was ten minutes past eleven when Mr Balfour drove up, he having come from Ramsgate, which, from the highest points on the course, could, with its white chalk cliffs, be seen glinting in the sunshine. Play was for the most part in foursomes. Mr A.B. Tennyson and Mr Osmond Williams who played against A. Ritchie ( “Skeel” ) and Geo. Stephen (“ Skadie”), were the first to start. Sir Henry Seton Karr and Mr Wanklyn with their opponents, Wm. Whyte and James Whyte, went next, followed by Mr H.W. Forster ( who, though a junior Lord of the treasury, must not be confounded with the secretary for war ), and Mr Soams, who represent political views of the opposite extreme. They had against them, Alex. Ritchie (“ Sang”) and Robert Stephen.

Mr Marshall Hall and Mr Pym had against them J.C. Buchan and Robert Masson. Those who were to play against the fishermen greeted them in the most friendly manner. As one fisherman remarked when Mr Osmond Williams, clad in the loudest pattern of golfing suits, went off chatting merrily with two of the guernsey, Blue Trousered, Inverallochy men.

“ I thoct they widna speak tae us, but mon, they are nice. For all that, James Buchan and Geo. Buchan, who were to play against the Prime Minister and Mr Chas. Eric Hambro, seemed just a little bit anxious. Mr Balfour, perhaps fearing this, sent for them to come into the clubhouse. Before they could get there by the way of the back lawns, Mr Balfour came out at the front, and catching them up at a corner, said cheerfully “ How are you?”.

The two fishermen saluted, and then shook hands with the Prime Minister, who soon put them entirely at their ease. Mr Balfour, being somewhat stiff with motoring, took a few preliminary drives before going to the tee. He arranged that the foursome should play a two ball match, and soon the players and the “ Gallery” had started on the round.

The fishernen’s ball lay the best, but James Buchan played the approach shot too strong, and Inverallochy lost the hole. At the next tee a photographer had his camera in readiness, and “ Joe.” Who had lingered in the crowd that followed, seemed disinclined to lend himself as a victim to the photographers, who have for days past chased the fishermen around London.

 “ Oh, come along,” said Mr Balfour, “ We’ll have to get photographed whither we like it or not.”

The next two drives were good, but the fishermen lay rather to the right in rough ground. They recovered well, but would naturally have lost had not Mr Balfour just missed holing out, and “ Joe.” Narrowly escaping from a stymie, halved the hole. The next hole was also halved, for though, as Mr Balfour said to “ Joe.” “ neither of us is very good” the Premier’s drive was the worst of the two. Jas. Buchan made rather a bad second shot. The fourth hole fell to the fishermen because their opponent’s ball got into a bunker, and Mr Balfour only got it out with the fourth stroke. At the fifth hole Mr Balfour’s drive landed the ball in a “ pot” bunker, and the ball when played out of that one landed in another of these small but deep pits just a few yards further ahead, which, as Mr Balfour truly remarked, was most annoying. But, Mr Balfour’s side won the hole after all for the fishermen’s second shot was rather short and the third carried away to the left.

However, the game was level again at the far famed Maiden hole. Between the tee and the green first stretches a waste of sand and then the Maiden Hill, the sides of which are bulwarked with heavy timbers. Unless the ball carries round the shoulder of the hill the hole is lost for a certainty. Both balls did travel well, and as James Buchan succeeded in holing out in three neither side was in front of the other.

The next hole fell to the fishermen, but the one that followed went to their opponents.

The green lay as it were round the corner of a little hill, and Mr Balfour knowing the nature of the place managed his approach shot so that the ball struck a little slope and rolled back again close to the hole. The Perliamentary side had thus this hole in three.

Mr Maconochie met the players at this point and shook hands with Mr Balfour. Another hole fell to the fishermen and then, after both sides had missed an easy three, another hole was halved. The next hole was lost to the fishermen, and the “ Gallery” became quite excited.

“ Charming” was the frequent exclamation of the lady enthusiasts as a fine stroke was made, and Mr Balfour’s free remarks  added not a little to the gaiety. He had just landed in a bunker, and was waggling his club as if desirous of ascertaining how the ball got there when he suddenly remarked “ I say, Hambro, I never did this for a whole fortnight.”

As for the fishermen few men could have had more perfect control over themselves. They were full of excitement, but they showed little signs of it. They, “ Cracked” with Aberdeenshire golfers, who, with the usual pushfulness of that county, thrust themselves upon their notion. A further reverse to the fishermen was followed by their opponents having to give up a hole. “ We may give them that” said Mr Balfour, seeing the case was hopeless, and so the game was even once more.

As they went forward, the fishermen’s play improved, while Mr Balfour, who was not up to his usual form, was continually getting his side into difficulties. First the fishermen got one up through Mr Balfour missing a putt, then Mr Hambro in driving, topped his ball, and Mr Balfour followed by putting it in a formidable bunker, which had for one of its sides railway sleepers set on end. The fourth stroke got the ball out, but the fishermen, who had fared rather better took the hole in 6 against 7. On going to the seventeenth hole, the fishermen were three up, but it was decided to play out the round, and the fishermen, losing the last two holes, finished one up.

In the second round the fishermen opposed to Mr Balfour and Mr Hambro, played very badly at the start. The first hole went to Mr Balfour’s side by 5 to 6. James Buchan “ Foozled” the second drive, and a lofted shot only landed the ball in a bunker. For the third hole the fishermen failed in the long game and were again down. It was not that the Parliamentary side were playing especially well. They took 6 to the fourth hole and won. At the Maiden, the fishermen landed in the waste of sand, and finding it impossible to carry the hill, gave up the hole, and were thus 6 down. Mr Balfour got into a bunker at the seventh hole. Mr Hambro cleared the ball, and Mr Balfour immediately drove it into the bents and gave up the hole.

At the eighth hole the fishermen were again 6 down, because the opposite side holed out in 2 against their opponent’s 3. Approaching the ninth hole, Mr Balfour drove the ball into one of the nastiest of the bunkers. A high wall of railway sleepers hit back the ball when Mr Hambro tried to get it out, and the fishermen, holing out in 4, won. On the way to the eleventh hole Mr Balfour’s side was 5 up, and they won the twelfth too. The fishermen, notwithstanding that they were bunkered, halved the thirteenth hole. At the fourteenth, Mr Balfour drove twice out of bounds, and then gave up the hole. At the fifteenth hole Mr Balfour was in the bents, but, though there was a possibility of halving, the fishermen won. The sixteenth hole was badly played on both sides, but the fishermen lost. “ Joe” just missed his putt at the seventeenth, and Mr Balfour did not. The eighteenth hole was halved in 4.

The afternoon’s play in the foursomes was disappointing. In the morning George and James Buchan had played a perfect long game, and what pulled down their winning margin was imperfect knowledge of how to play on so fine greens. The breakdown in the afternoon may be attributed to the fact that the fishermen never practice one round of golf after another, and not being accustomed to the niceties of matchplay, may have made a dinner of the luncheon instead of taking but a little snack.

In the foursome that included Messrs Osmond Williams, A.B. Tennyson and A. Ritchie and George Stephens, the fishermen were in the morning square on going to the sixteenth hole, but they lost that one and the next. The fifth, sixth, and seventh holes they won in 3s.In the afternoon, when they played a two ball match, they were 5 down and 4 to play.

Messrs Ritchie and Stephen, who opposed Messrs Forster and Soams, were square at the seventh hole in the morning, and lost the last one. In the afternoon the fishermen were 2 down, but had it been a two-ball match instead of a four, they would probably have won, because Mr Soams showed indifferent form.

J.C Buchan and R. Masson, who beat Mr Marshall Hall and Mr Guy Pym by 5 and 3 in the morning, were four up at the ninth hole. J.C Buchan played Mr Pym in a single in the afternoon, and they were square at the ninth. Mr Pym took the tenth and eleventh, but Buchan squared again. With ordinary luck he should have had the seventeenth, which would have left the last hole to decide the match, but Mr Pym’s ball coming over a hill lay, after many twists and turns, just on the lip of the hole, so that Buchan was 2 down and 1 to play.

Robert Masson, who played Mr Marshall Hall was far down when, changing his driver for his brassey, he took four holes right away. But he could not, owing to hard luck, save himself from finishing 7 down and 6 to play. He could do nothing against the putting of Mr Marshall Hall, who has a special putter, like a croquet mallet, which he says, is his own invention.

The Whytes had a very close game with Sir Henry Seton Karr and Mr Wanklyn.

The results were ;-

 

First Round

 

Mr A.J Balfour and Mr Eric Hambro were beaten by James Buchan and George Buchan by 1 hole.

Mr H.W. Forster and Mr A.W. Soams beat A. Ritchie and R. Stephens by 1.

Sir H. Seton Karr and Mr J.L. Wanklyn beat W. Whyte and J. Whyte by 2 and 1.

Mr Marshall Hall and Mr Guy Pym were beaten by J.C. Buchan and R. Masson by 5 and 3.

Mr Osmond Williams and Mr A.B. Tennyson beat A. Ritchie and G. Stephen by 2 holes.

Result ;- House Of Commons 3, Inverallochy 2.

 

Second Round

 

Mr A.J. Balfour and Mr Eric Hambro beat James Buchan and George Buchan by 6 and 5.

Mr H.W. Forster and Mr A.W. Soams beat A. Ritchie and R. Stephen by 2 and 1.

Sir H. Seton Karr and Mr J.L. Wanklyn beat W. Whyte and J. Whyte 1 up.

Mr Marshall Hall beat R. Masson by 7 and 6.

Mr Guy Pym beat J.C. Buchan by 2 and 1

Mr Osmond Williams and Mr A.B. Tennyson beat A. Ritchie and J. Stephen by 6 and 5.

House Of Commons 6, Inverallochy 0

 

Grand Total

 

House Of Commons ……….   …………..    ……  9 matches

Inverallochy  ……………..  ……….  …………..   2 matches

 

Peterhead Sentinel January 26th, 1907

 

Mr James Murray, M.P., Recently presented a handsome silver cup to be competed for by the members of the Inverallochy golf club, and Mr W.J. Brown, Liberal organiser, who is presently residing in that district has presented two handsome medals for the winner of the cup and the runner-up.

Scotsman February 4th, 1909

 

Almost Defunct

 

At the annual meeting of the members of this club arrangements were made for the ensuing season. Last year the club had been almost defunct owing to the late date at which the fishermen returned from the English fishings. The finances were reported to be in a fairly satisfactory condition. Mr D.C. Dundas was re-appointed Captain

 

Aberdeen Journal April 5th, 1938

 

Golf Again At Inverallochy

_______________

 

Wild Course To Be

“Re-claimed”

­­­­­­­­­­­­­_______________

 

Famous Match With M.P.s Recalled

 

Efforts are to be made to resuscitate the Inverallochy golf club, which has been defunct for about fifteen or sixteen years.

At a meeting held recently, a committee was formed, and various schemes have been considered for providing funds to restore the course to playing condition again. The club closed down about sixteen years ago, mainly owing to the depression in the fishing industry at the time. The majority of its members were fishermen.

In the early part of this century, when Mr A.W. McConochie was M.P. for East Aberdeenshire, he took a team of Inverallochy fishermen golfers to London to play a team representing the House Of Commons. The Parliamentary team won by a narrow margin.

Mr George Buchan ( “ Eddie’s Joe” ), who is taking a leading part in the efforts to revive the club, was a member of that team. His opponent was the late Mr A.J. Balfour, afterwards Lord Balfour. Each member of the Inverallochy team received from his opponent a golf club with the M.P.s name inscribed on it. These club’s can be seen in several of the fishermen’s houses to-day.

At the meeting held in the Inverallochy Hall, Mr Geo. Buchan, Captain for many years, presided. The following were elected office bearers :- Patroness, Mrs Mackenzie Fraser ; President, The Rev. M. Hughes ; Captain, Geo. Buchan ; Secretary and Treasurer, Robert Stephen, 16 Charles Street, Inverallochy ; Committee, Gilbert Buchan, Andrew Masson, Andrew Whyte, Alex Ritchie, Jas Ritchie, Geo. Buchan, 20 Mid Street.

Considerable funds will be required, as the greater part of the existing course is like a wilderness, but the committee are losing no time. A sale of work, which it is intended, to hold at the end of April, should, together with a concert or two, raise enough money to put at least nine holes in playing condition. The course can then be extended as funds are available.

Aberdeen Journal, March 22nd,1939.

 

Inverallochy Course Re-opened

 

After extensive repairs Inverallochy golf course was opened by Mr George Buchan

 ( “ Eddie’s Geo.” ) Captain of the club, who drove off the first ball with a club presented to him by the late Earl Balfour in the year 1906.

An exhibition game was then played by Jack Pressley, Fraserburgh champion, and James Gibb, the professional, against James A. Ritchie and Gilbert Strachan, Inverallochy.

There was a large gathering of spectators, and despite the boisterous weather conditions playing was of a very high standard. At the end of the first nine holes the match was all square, then the Fraserburgh couple forged ahead, and won by 4 and 3.

Aberdeen Evening Express October 24th, 1951

 

A committee elected at a public meeting to represent the Inverallochy golf club and the inhabitants of Inverallochy, have purchased from Monsignor Fraser, the links of Cairndinnity, Hallmoss, and Bankhead.

The transaction was carried out on behalf of Inverallochy golf club and Inverallochy general public. The links will be used as a golf course and a recreation ground for the village,

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