Forgotten Golfing Greens Of Scotland
 Forgotten Golfing Greens Of Scotland

Loch Awe & Dalmally.

Loch Awe and Dalmally Golf Club.  Founded 1907.  A 9-hole course on land owned by Castles Farm to the west of Stronmilchan Road close to its junction with the (now) A 85, 1 mile from Lochawe station. “A 9 hole course is being laid out at Loch Awe by Charlie Hunter. There is already a resident professional supervising the work and the club is in formation.” (GI 15.3.07).

 

     "The new course of the Lochawe and Dalmally club was formally opened to-day by Mrs Campbell of Blythswood, who drove off the first ball. Thereafter an exhibition game was played between the Professional, Hugh Logan of Whitecraigs and Willie Brown, the home professional. Amongst those present at the opening ceremony were Mr J. Gordon Simpson, a member of the Scottish International Team, and Mr J.H. McGregor, ex-gold medallist of the Edinburgh Burgess Golfing Society, who will play a match with the Professionals in the afternoon. (EED 6.6.1907) 

     “Great though it’s reputation may be in point of historical associations, it’s scenery, and the sport it affords to disciples of Isaac Walton, the district of Lochawe has been without the one thing needful from the point of view of the average visitor – a golf course.

That want has now been supplied. Situated on the farm of castles, about a mile east of Lochawe Station and Hotel, the new course consists of nine holes, and with such enthusiasm and energy has the project been undertaken that already mention is made of the possibility of extending the round to eighteen holes. To the veteran Prestwick professional, Charles Hunter, was entrusted the task of shaping the course. The nine holes are excellently placed with the view of providing capital sport, and in all other respects he has made the most of the ground at his disposal.

     Like other courses in the raw state, that the Lochawe is still rough in places, but with a continuance of the drainage operations and other works now in progress, the course, with it’s knolls, ridges, hillocks, and mountain burns, should in a very short time take it’s place as one of the best of it’s kind in the west of Scotland. As regards the greens no effort has been spared to provide a good putting surface, and to keep it in first class condition. The turf, of fine close texture, has been brought from Kinloss, in Morayshire, a distance of 200 miles, and in order to preserve it from cattle and sheep, substantial wire fencing has been erected around each green.

     There was a goodly gathering of ladies and gentlemen around the flagstaff, from the top of which the Lion Rampant fluttered gail in the breeze, when the opening ceremony took place on Saturday. Amongst those present were, Miss Campbell of Blythswood, Mr Charles H. Alston of Letterawe, Mrs and the misses Alston, Miss Brown, Carnock, Mr Duncan Fraser of Carrigthura, Mrs and the Misses Fraser, Mrs  Macdonald, Corries, Miss Connell, Mrs Kyd, Carnoustie, Mr R McDairmid, Corries, Mr and Mrs McLean, Dalmally, Miss Allan, Dr Cameron, Dalmally, The Rev. Farquar McRae, Dalmally, Mr T Dow, Mr P Wight and Mr J Farquar, secretary and treasurer of the club.

     Mr C. H. Alston said he was sorry Mr Gilfrid Hartley or Hayfield, the first captain of the club, was unavoidably prevented from being present to ask Miss Campbell to strike off the first ball. Miss Campbell would do so with an ancient putter made by Tom Morris fifty years ago, which might be emblematical, perhaps of the best traditions of the Royal and ancient game, and she would use the latest thing in American rubber-cored balls, which might be emblematical of the latest improvements and conditions of the game. It was by keeping in view all that was best in the ancient traditions of the game, and in it’s novelties, that they hoped to carry on that club and course. (Applause.)

     Miss Campbell, in declaring the course open, said she was sure they would admit the scenery was unrivalled, and she thought they would find there a course which only wanted playing over it to make it an excellent one. She hoped it would in time be extended to eighteen holes. And that she would be asked to open it in it’s extended form. (Hoar, hear.) Thereafter a match was played between the Whitecraigs professional, Hugh Logan, and the local man, Willie Brown, which resulted in a win for Logan by two up and one two play. Mr J. Gordon Simpson and Mr J. H. McGregor also had a round, and the Scottish internationalist, who covered the nine holes in 36, won by two up and one to play. In the afternoon the amateurs played with the professionals, when the amateurs won by one hole.

     On the invitation of Mr Duncan Fraser of Carrigthura, who has been taken a keen in the promotion of the club, a number of the visitors were subsequently entertained at luncheon in the Lochawe Hotel. (S 10.6.1907)

      “The nine holes are excellently placed with the view of providing capital sport, and in all other respects Charles Hunter has made the most of the ground at his disposal. Like other courses in the raw state, Lochawe is still rough in places, but with a continuance of the drainage operations and other works now in progress, the course, with it’s knolls, ridges, hillocks, and mountain burns, should in a very short time take it’s place as one of the best of it’s kind in the west of Scotland. As regards the greens no effort has been spared to provide a good putting surface, and to keep it in first class condition. The turf, of fine close texture, has been brought from Kinloss, in Morayshire, a distance of 200 miles, and in order to preserve it from cattle and sheep, substantial wire fencing has been erected around each green.” (S 10.6.1907) 

Length of Course,  1879 yards

Hole No.   1         2        3         4         5        6         7         8         9

Length    270    225    176    140    160    200    160    300    240

 “A very nicely situated and good sporting course. Turf for greens has been brought from the sea-side and is doing well.  Good pavilion for use of members and visitors(ladies and gentlemen).”  (WWG)

 

Membership 50.  Club wound up in 1915 and the land reverted to agricultural use, mainly potatoes. 

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