Forgotten Golfing Greens Of Scotland
 Forgotten Golfing Greens Of Scotland

Saughton Park, Edinburgh

Saughton Park Golf Course

    “By the opening of the Saughton Park last week, the golfers of Edinburgh have been put in possession of another public course.  The ceremony was performed by Sir Robert Cranston, and to Miss Cranston was assigned the duty of driving the first ball, a part of the ceremony which was carried through in a highly creditable manner with a silver mounted driver gifted to the lady by the new Saughton Golf Club. 

   The returns already show that the golf course has been opened not a moment too soon.  During the last three days of the week 386 players went over the course, and the average daily attendance will in all probability increase as the course improves with play,.

   The ground, which extends to 90 acres, is bounded on the one side by the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, and on the mansion-houses of Saughton and Galgreen. Owing to the spell of dry weather the ground at present is hard, but a good coating of grass ensures a kindly lie for the ball. 

   The length of the holes are as follows;- 

First, 286yards;      second, 230yards;    third, 169yards;

fourth, 110yards;     fifth, 358yards;         sixth, 289yards;

seventh, 194yards;  eighth, 264yards;      ninth, 184yards. 

   A pavilion giving accommodation for golfers on the one side and cricketers and footballers on the other will be erected near the first tee. 

   The course was laid out and the various hazards’ formed under the superintendence of Mr McHattie, the city gardener, and the work bears evidence of no mean skill.  In the preparation of the course for play Mr McHattie has devoted much time and care.

   The charge for golf will be 2d per round of eighteen holes”   (S20.6.1905)

Saughton Golf Club

 

   "A public meeting was held in the Ardmillan Hall, Murieston Road,Edinburgh, last night, for the purpose of forming a golf club in connection with the new public course at Saughton, Mr W.M. Falconer presided over an attendance of about thirty. 

   After Councillor McArthy had explained the plan of the course, it was unanimously decide, on the motion of the Chairman, seconded by Mr R.M. Brunton, and supported by Councillor Neill and Baillie Mallinson that such a club be formed. Councillor McArthy mentioned that no singles or threesomes were to be allowed on Saturdays.  It is agreed that the club be named “Saughton Golf Club”, and that its affairs be managed by the office-bearers and seven members of committee. 

   The office-bearers were appointed as follows:- Captain, Mr W.M. Falconer, vice-captain, Mr R.M. Burton, secretary, Mr J. Stormont, and treasurer, Mr J Minty. 

   After discussion, it was agreed that the annual subscription be fixed at 6s.  It was stated in the course of the evening that in all probability the course would be ready for play by June.'   (S 15.3.1905)

E W. Public Park for Edinburgh

June 15th 1905 The Scotsman

 

The now public park laid out at Saughton, on ground acquired in 1899 from Sir William Gardiner Baird, Bart, at a cost of £52,900, was formally opened yesterday by Lord Provost Sir Robert Cranston.  Along with the Lord Provost were Lady and Miss Cranston.  Many members of the Corporation were also in attendance, and between 500 and 600 people had gathered near the first tee of the golf course when the ceremony took place at half-past three o’clock,  The ground, which extends to 90 acres, is bounded on the one side by the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, and on the mansion-houses of Saughton and Galgreen. Councillor Maxton, convener of the Parks Committee, before calling upon the Lord Provost, said they were met for the purpose of opening the first section of that new public park.  The convener of the Parks Committee at the time of the purchase was Colonel Forbes Mackay, who he was glad to see there – (applause)-and to Colonel Forbes Mackay, Bailie Mackenzie and Councillors Walker and Harrison who had all since retired, and to Councillor Telfer, who was still with them, the city was indebted for the initiation and successful carrying through of the purchase. The field they were met in came into the possession of the city two years ago, and had been laid out as a nine holes golf course.  The two large fields immediately to the south would come into the possession of the city in November, and would be laid out-that to the west as a football field, and that to the east for cricket.  It was proposed also to have a children’s gymnasium, and probably a pond for skating in winter and model yachting in summer.  Included in the scheme for the development of the park were a bandstand about the centre and also a pavilion, which would give accommodation for golfers of both sexes, and also for football players and cricketers.  (Applause.)

The Lord Provost, in declaring the park open said they were deeply indebted to Colonel Forbes Mackay and those other gentlemen who took an interest in the purchase.  They wanted to do all they could in the interests of the public to make Edinburgh more and more a place of resort for everybody.

Councillor Stevenson, as ranger of the park, said he had the greatest possible pleasure in accepting its custody on behalf of the people of that district.  He impressed upon all those who used the district.  He impressed upon all those who used the park,the fact that it was their own property, and said they would best show their appreciation of the great boon that had been conferred up-on them by taking the greatest possible care of the park. (Applause.)

Councillor Telfer proposed a vote of thanks to the Lord Provost and thereafter,

Councillor Maxton presented to Miss Cranston a silver salver bearing the following inscription;-“Presented to Miss Cranston by the Corporation of Edinburgh on the occasion of the opening of the Saughton Park by Sir Robert Cranston, 14th June 1905.”  On behalf of the Saughton Golf Club Mr W.M. Falconer, captain, presented Miss Cranston with a golf club, bearing a suitable inscription, with which to drive the first ball.  Councillor Neill thanked Miss Cranston for consenting to carry through that part of the ceremony.  To Lady Cranston, Mr McHattie, City Gardener, handed a beautiful bouquet of roses.

The Lord Provost in returning thanks on behalf of his wife and daughter, said that had he guessed his daughter was to be presented with such a beautiful memento of the occasion, he might have suggested that it should go to his wife, because there was a possibility of that present being removed to another place within the next twelve months.  (Applause and laughter.)   He thanked them all for a long continued kindness to himself and his family, which, he assured them, he thoroughly appreciated and very much esteemed. (Applause.).

The company thereafter stepped down from the temporary platform to the first tee-off which amid loud applause, Miss Cranston drove the first ball. Foursomes were afterwards played by several members of Corporation and their lady friends.  Tea was served in a marquee erected on the ground, and music was provided by the band of the 17th Lancers.

 

Edinburgh’s Latest Golf Course

June 20th 1905 The Scotsman

 

By the opening of the Saughton Park last week, the golfers of Edinburgh have been put in possession of another public course.  The ceremony was performed by Sir Robert Cranston, and to Miss Cranston was assigned the duty of driving the first ball, a part of the ceremony which was carried through in a highly creditable manner with a silver mounted driver gifted to the lady by the new Saughton Golf Club.  The returns already show that the golf course has been opened not a moment too soon.  During the last three days of the week 386 players went over the course, and the average daily attendance will in all probability increase as the course improves with play,. Owing to the spell of dry weather the ground at present is hard, but a good coating of grass ensures a kindly lie for the ball.  The length of the holes is as follows;-  First, 286yards; second, 230yards; third, 169yards; fourth, 110yards; fifth, 358yards; sixth, 289yards; seventh, 194yards; eighth, 264yards; ninth, 184yards.  A pavilion giving accommodation for golfers on the one side and cricketers and footballers on the other will be erected near the first tee.  The course was laid out and the various hazards’ formed under the superintendence of Mr McHattie, the city gardener, and the work bears evidence of no mean skill.  In the preparation of the course for play Mr McHattie has devoted much time and care.

 

Saughton Park Course

March 21st 1905 The Scotsman

 

Meantime the Gorgie golfers have had their wants attended to.  In June next they will be put in possession of the nine holes course which has been laid out by Mr J.W. McHattie, head gardener of the city, on a portion of the ground at Saughton, acquired by the city come years ago from Sir William Gardiner Baird. During the winter months a squad of Edinburgh’s unemployed was turned on to the course to cut bunkers and otherwise prepare the ground for play.  Mr McHattie, who is a golfer himself, has made the most of the ground at his disposal, and has displayed great skill in the work, whether regard be had to the formation of the greens, the tees, or the bunkers.  The length of the holes is as follows;-  First, 286yards; second, 230yards; third, 169 yards; fourth, 410 yards; fifth, 358yards, sixth, 289yards; seventh, 194yards; eighth; 264yards;  ninth, 184yards.  Not only is there variety in the length, but at no point has it been found necessary to introduce crossing.  The first tee is situated at a point on the south side of the park almost due north of Saughton House, the intention being to erect a pavilion near that spot.  The cricket and football grounds converge at the same place, so that the pavilion will be available and equally convenient for the devotees of each class of sport.  The erection of the pavilion will be proceeded with immediately should the Town council agree to the recommendation of the Public Parks Committee, and the golfers will be first in possession; the football and cricket grounds being still in the hands of the farmer.  The greens and tees have been constructed of turf from the Blackford Hill, and give every promise of fulfilling the expectations of \Mr McHattie, who has seen to it that some variety will be lent to the putting by the introduction of a billowy surface here and there.  In forming the bunkers Mr McHattie has preserved, as far as possible, the amenity of the park.  No hideous mounds of earth mar the landscape, and the golfer who is not familiar with the ground will discover the various traps across and by the side of the line of play only when he comes up by them.  The bunkers, which have all been judiciously placed, for the most part guard the greens, though some of them, as at the first and fifth holes, are destined to catch the faulty tee stroke.  It is the head gardener’s intention to have them faced with railway sleepers.  The course throughout abounds in good strong turf, which will benefit greatly from the top dressing, recently applied to it. Some of the Gorgie golfers have already formed a club, with the intention of making the new course their headquarters.

 

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