Forgotten Golfing Greens Of Scotland
 Forgotten Golfing Greens Of Scotland

What a location for a clubhouse !!

Tighnabruiach.

Glasgow Herald April 12th, 1894

 

A club has been formed here, and a course of nine holes, which has been in course of preparation for some time, is now so far completed as to admit of the enjoyment of play.

The Scotsman April 13th, 1894

Tignabruaich

 

A club has been formed here, and a course of nine holes, which has been in preparation for some time, is now so far completed as to admit of the enjoyment of a game at any time by visitors.The course is situated within easy walking distance from Tihnabruaich – Auchenlochan and Kames Pier – and commands an exceptionally fine view of the beautiful scenery which surrounds it, embracing the Kyles Of Bute, Ascog Loch, Loch Fyne, &c, Machines conveying passengers from Tignabruaich Pier pass the course daily.

The Buteman April 21st, 1894

Tighnabruaich Club

 

A good golf course of 9 holes has been prepared on the Ardlamont estate, within two miles of Tighnabruaich pier, and only a few minutes walk from Kames pier. A local club has been formed, and it is hoped the links will prove an additional attraction to visitors.

1894 April 21st oban times

 

Formation

 

Formation of a Golf Club.-  Through the energetic efforts of a few gentlemen in the neighbourhood of Tighnabruaich and district, a Golf Club has been formed, and a good course of nine holes has been prepared and completed. The course is situated on Ardlamont estate, within two miles of Tighnabruaich Pier and one mile of Auchenlochan Pier, Kames Pier being within a few minutes walk from the starting point, and as it is situated on hilly ground, a splendid view of the far famed Kyles of Bute and Lochfyne and neighbourhood can be seen, while the breeze from the water will tend in warm weather to cool the most enthusiastic golfer.  It is expected that the new golf links will be an additional attraction to the numerous visitors. Mr Chalmers, Copeswood, Auchenlochan, is secretary.

Oban Times April 24th, 1894

 

Tighnabruiach Golf Club. 1.  Instituted 1894.  A 9-hole coursee on the Ardlamont Estate, within easy walking of the village. 

Through the energetic efforts of a few gentlemen in the neighbourhood of Tighnabruaich and district, a Golf Club has been formed, and a good course of nine holes has been prepared and completed. The course is situated on Ardlamont estate, within two miles of Tighnabruaich Pier and one mile of Auchenlochan Pier, Kames Pier being within a few minutes walk from the starting point, and as it is situated on hilly ground, a splendid view of the far famed Kyles of Bute and Loch Fyne and neighbourhood can be, while the breeze from the water will tend in warm weather to cool the most enthusiastic golfer.  It is expected that the new golf links will be an additional attraction to the numerous visitors. Mr Chalmers, Copeswood, Auchenlochan, is secretary.” (OT 21.4.1894)

Last mentioned 1901.

Glasgow Herald April 12th, 1894

 

A club has been formed here, and a course of nine holes, which has been in course of preparation for some time, is now so far completed as to admit of the enjoyment of play.

The Buteman June 8th, 1895

 

The splendid new golf course on Kames farm. Millhouse Road, is in capital order, and should be largely taken advantage of this season. The hon. Secretary, Mr R. Duncan, Royal Hotel, will be glad to give any information required.

The Buteman June 27th, 1896

Golf Club

 

This club, which was formed under auspicious auspices two years ago, seems to have died a natural death. Not a solitary golfer is to be seen perambulating the links now, which is a pity, as a pleasanter summer game and exercise than golf is still to be invented. It is strange that it should die here, where everywhere else it gives signs of extraordinary vitality. I am not a prophet, but I dare to say it will yet arise here like the phoenix from its ashes.

Evening Star, July 29th, 1903

 

Death Of Mr Nicol

 

Mr Nicol was a country gentleman, who inherited from his father 9,000 acres at Ardmarnoch, near Tignabruaich. In 1894 he bought the famous Ardlamont Estate, the scene of the death of Cecil Hambrough, and converted it into a golf course for visitors to the Kyles Of Bute. However, he sold the property a couple of years later, just after his first entrance to Parliament.

The Buteman July 22nd, 1905

 

We notice that Rothesay goes in for a new golf course. When are we likely to follow this good example ?, Surely we can have a golf course when such places as Pirnmill, Arran, can have one. Every other holiday resort recognises how much its success depends on golfing facilities.

We have at present, a large number of English visitors with us, and they are sure to be more in evidence during the month of August, as Tighnabruaich is now quite a favourite resort with them.

Slightly different view from the main picture.

The Buteman June 2nd, 1906

Golfing.

 

A circular is being sent round the district calling a public meeting of those interested in the formation of a golf course, and for securing a suitable course. It will be held in the drill hall ( Duncan’s ) Auchenlochan, on Friday evening, 1st June ; as the circular states, this muster is of vital importance for the prosperity of the place, as few places of any importance that wishes to be in the forefront as health or watering resorts, but have or are getting golf courses laid out, and until we get a golf course or Bowling Green we need not pride ourselves of being one of the leading watering places on the Clyde. Those who have an interest in golfing, and those who have any interest in attracting visitors to this district, have now the opportunity to say whether they desire golfing to be one of our attractions and we sincerely hope they will approach the subject with an open mind, and give it all the consideration and assistance necessary to carry the matter to a successful issue. We believe a number of leading ladies and gentlemen are taking the matter up, and it is hoped there will be a large attendance on Friday evening, ladies being particularly and specially invited.

 

These guys are teeing off from the low ground on what was one of the prettiest golf courses in Scotland. 

The Buteman June 9th, 1906

Golfing

 

The first preliminary meeting was held on Friday, when there was present a fair turn-out of ladies and gentlemen, who, by their presence, at once showed that some interest was being taken not only in golfing, but also in what a golfing club might do in the way of attracting people to the district. A committee composed of the following gentlemen was then proposed to go into the matter more thoroughly, viz., Col. Jamieson, Rev. H.M. Rankin, Rev. J. Menzies, Dr. McDonald, and Dr. Wolfe.

A meeting was again held in the same hall on Monday evening, with Mr Neil Nicolson, again Chairman, when the committee reported, after having the advice of an expert that the most suitable ground was at Upper Kames. This ground, which is fairly convenient, could be had from the farmer at a reasonable rent. It was then decided that a golf club should be formed, all those present signifying their intention of becoming members. The meeting was again adjourned so that some idea might be formed of the number of people in the district who might become members. The same committee of gentlemen was appointed, with the addition of seven ladies, who are to report further progress on Friday evening first. We learn that good progress has been made, and that a good round sum has already been guaranteed.

Next week we will report further.

The Buteman June 16th, 1906

Golf

 

The adjourned meeting in connection with the formation of a golf club for the district was held in Friday evening last in the Auchenlochan Hall, when there was a fair turnout of ladies and gentlemen. The Rev. N.F. Macfie, who was called to the chair, at once proceeded with the business of the meeting by asking the ladies committee who had been appointed at the previous meeting to report progress in connection with the number of people who had promised to join or become interested in the club. Miss Jamieson, Medrox, who had been acting as secretary, stated that the proposal had been well received throughout the district, and that no fewer than 74 names of ladies and gentlemen had been received who intended joining the club. After hearing such a favourable report, Dr McDonald proposed that a club be formed to be called the Kyles Of Bute golf club, and this was at once agreed to, but while arrangements could be made with the farmer, it was suggested and agreed that Col. Jamieson and Dr Wolfe approach the proprietors of the estate on which the ground is to be laid out – Messrs R & W Watson – regarding some fixity of tenure, and should they arrive at some satisfactory arrangement, to proceed at once by employing an expert, who would see to the laying out of the most suitable course. The whole meeting seemed most enthusiastic and at once proceeded to elect office bearers for the ensuing year. There can be no question now that a golf course is assured, and that, in the near future the whole district will derive some benefit from this additional attraction to our shores, and we will be glad to report any further developments in connection with our new golf club. The following are the names of those who were appointed office bearers :- Ladies Committee – President, Mrs Simmons of Sherebrook ; Captain, Miss Turnbull ; Vice Captain, Mrs Wolfe ; Secretary, Miss Jamieson, Medrox ; Committee, Miss Anderson, Miss Cowan, Miss A. Duncan, Miss McFie.

Gentlemens Committee – President, Col. Jamieson of Medrox ; Vice President, Rev R.F. MacFie ; Captain, Dr Wolfe ; Vice Captain, Rev. J. Menzies ; Secretary and Treasurer, Mr Auther Barret, M.A., Schoolhouse ; Committee, Rev. H.M. Rankin, Dr McDonald, Mr Durnford, Mr N. Nicolson, and Mr J. Gillies.

Sheila brandishing the mashie at Tighnabruiach

The Buteman June 23rd, 1906

Golf

 

Acommittee meeting of the Kyles Of Bute golf club was held at Medrox on Monday evening last, when there was a full attendance of members, with Col. Jamieson, President, in the chair. The principal business was the reading of the communication from the proprietors of Ardlamont estate – Messrs R. & W. Watson – regarding the ground for the proposed course. The letter was of a most favourable nature, with the promise of giving every facility for the making and forming both the club and course. Arrangements with the farmer, Mr Fraser, have now been arranged : as also the services of Mr David Adams, Glasgow, professional expert who will be here today ( Saturday ) to mark out the holes, and to give a probable estimate of the cost, but the work is to be proceeded with at once, and it is expected that by the beginning of July the course will be playable. Of course the greens, &c, will get a thorough overhaul during the winter and spring months, so that by the beginning of next season it is expected we will have a golf course equal to any on the West of Scotland. At the same meeting a green committee was appointed consisting of the Rev. N.M. Macfie, Rev. J. M. Menzies, Dr Wolfe, and the secretary, Mr Barret, who have also have any further necessary arrangements in hand.

We are sorry that in last weeks list of the ladies committee we omitted the name of Miss Turnbull, of Rosebank.

The Buteman July 7th, 1906

Golf Course

 

The workmen have been engaged at the greens for some time now, and the course will be ready in a short time. It is proposed to have a friendly with the Rothesay club after the members have had practice for a week or two. The experts who are laying off the greens declare that in all their experience of golf courses they have never seen one with such a charming view as meets the eye from this one of ours. They cannot understand why the doctorns were so eager to have this course formed, for those who play golf, especially over a course so conducive to health and pleasure as this one is, will, unfortunately for them, rarely, if ever, require the benefit of medical skill.

This will add another to the many quiet, sweet attractions of Kames and Tignabruaich, and visitors to both places we feel sure, will be delighted to avail themselves of the grand opportunity it will afford them of gulping in deep chest filling mouthfuls of the health giving ozone. Its health and pleasure they come down here for principally, and we will do our best to place the means at their disposal.

The Buteman July 14th, 1906

Golf Course

 

Great progress has already been made over the course, which we understand will be playable on Saturday first. We believe it is not the intention to open the course officially this year, leaving that for the beginning of next summer, when it will be in thoroughly good order.

Another one of my wee jaunts, What a life !!

The Buteman July 21st, 1906

Proposed golf club concert

 

A correspondent writes :- I hear that a concert in aid of the Kyles Of Bute golf club has been arranged by several young ladies in Tignabruaich. The date fixed is Friday September 7th. I understand the services of Mr W. Graham Moffat and Miss Kate Moffat have been secured. I am sure those of us who had the pleasure of hearing that clever elocutionist at the benefit concert last September will be only too glad to avail ourselves of the opportunity of hearing Mr Moffat again.

Golfing

 

The rules and conditions of membership have now been drawn up, and on Saturday last the course was open for playing over, but unfortunately the weather broke down and prevented anyone from making a start. Again on Monday the weather was unfavourable but since that quite a number of residents and visitors have gone the round. The scores we have heard nothing about, but a number of visitors have expressed the opinion that the course will be a first class one, and sure to attract golfers from other quarters.

The Buteman July 28th, 1906

Golfing

 

Now that the weather has improved since the opening day, there has been a large number of members and others playing over the course, which is now proving an unqualified success. We have heard nothing but praise for the course and surroundings, and we predict that golfing will be one of the leading features of the district very shortly. Even already a number of houses have been taken through the attraction of the new golf course. It is rather soon yet to put up a record for the round, but at present it has been done from 50 up to 150, the last score being done by a very green hand.

The Buteman July 28th, 1906

The New Golf Course

 

The golf course at Kames was a great attraction last Saturday, and the devotees of the royal and ancient game had quite a good time, and a large number did the round with great enjoyment. Everyone was delighted with the beautiful view, especially from holes 4 and 8. One gentleman, who has been over most of the golf courses in Britain and the continent, thinks it a grand course in every respect, not only as regards the delightful prospect, but all round. The bunkers and other hazards with which the course abounds are of the kind dear to the heart of the golfer, for their correct negotiation requires skill and headwork.

He predicts a great future for it once its great merits become known. The record score of 44 made the previous week got a rude knock out. One member did the round in 42. The holder came in with the fine score of 41, but even this failed to stand out against the prowess of Mr Adams, under whose skilful management, the course was laid off, who came home with the remarkably low score considering how short a time it is since the course was formed of 39 strokes for the round of nine holes.

This will stand for a time, we should think for it is a score that will take some beating.

The Buteman August 18th 1906

 

The golf course is becoming more and more of an attraction every day, and one of the members has been successful in lowering the record put up by Mr Adams of 39 strokes for the round of nine holes to 36 strokes for the round – a praiseworthy performance, for the course is full of bunkers and hazards to trap the unwary, and does not at all favour a low score, and even golfers of skill and experience get trapped at times. For instance, in playing to hole No. 6, if one gets his tee shot well away he may come to grief at the burn which guards the green about twenty yards in front of it : if one fails in this drive from the tee and gets among the heather, he can easily spend about ten minutes playing a game that more resembles Tip-Cat than golf, and run up a score of ten strokes for a hole that can be done in 5 by skilful negotiation. But this is one of the never - failing charms of the Royal and Ancient game on almost all courses, but more especially on this excellent one of ours, which is one of the best from a golfers point of view, for each hole, even the simplest looking has its trap to catch the unwary.

The Buteman September 1st, 1906

The Kyles Of Bute Golf Club

 

The course is improving daily, and favoured by the genial weather of the last few days it has been much patronised by visitors and members. Some fine cards have been handed in, but notwithstanding this and some gallant attempts made to lower it.

The record score of 36 for the nine holes still satnds unbroken, which must be very gratifying to the holder. The Kyles club played their first match – a five a side – with a team of Glen Caladh players over the Glen Caladh golf course and gained an unexpected victory over a good team.

A good beginning, Kyles : keep it up !. The win is all the more meritorious too, in that the Kyles players were playing over a strange course. The Kyles players who won were :- Messrs Miller, Wilson and Duncan and Dr Wolfe. A return match takes place shortly over the Kyles golf course, and this should prove a match well worth seeing as the contestants are very evenly matched, and should attract a big crowd of interested spectators. The greens are being overhauled in view of the match taking place : still they will fall far short of the billiard-table like smoothness of the Glen Caladh greens which are a treat to play on. This will handicap the Glen Caladh players a liitle, for the Kyles greens cannot be expected to be quite up to the mark for a long time to come, and some of them, no matter how evenly laid, cut, and rolled – Nos. 3 and 7, especially – will always be difficult to negotiate in putting, they lie so much on the slant. One may get on to either of these greens by correct play in two, and yet run up four or five more strokes ere he has done with the putting, unless he exercises much judgment and skilful manipulation of the ball, and even then may come to grief, for the ball cuts some very curious capers on these greens.

    The Buteman  September 1st, 1906

The Kyles Of Bute Golf                   Club

 

The course is improving daily, and favoured by the genial weather of the last few days it has been much patronised by visitors and members. Some fine cards have been handed in, but notwithstanding this and some gallant attempts made to lower it.

The record score of 36 for the nine holes still satnds unbroken, which must be very gratifying to the holder. The Kyles club played their first match – a five a side – with a team of Glen Caladh players over the Glen Caladh golf course and gained an unexpected victory over a good team.

A good beginning, Kyles : keep it up !. The win is all the more meritorious too, in that the Kyles players were playing over a strange course. The Kyles players who won were :- Messrs Miller, Wilson and Duncan and Dr Wolfe. A return match takes place shortly over the Kyles golf course, and this should prove a match well worth seeing as the contestants are very evenly matched, and should attract a big crowd of interested spectators. The greens are being overhauled in view of the match taking place : still they will fall far short of the billiard-table like smoothness of the Glen Caladh greens which are a treat to play on. This will handicap the Glen Caladh players a liitle, for the Kyles greens cannot be expected to be quite up to the mark for a long time to come, and some of them, no matter how evenly laid, cut, and rolled – Nos. 3 and 7, especially – will always be difficult to negotiate in putting, they lie so much on the slant. One may get on to either of these greens by correct play in two, and yet run up four or five more strokes ere he has done with the putting, unless he exercises much judgment and skilful manipulation of the ball, and even then may come to grief, for the ball cuts some very curious capers on these greens.

The Buteman September 8th, 1906

 

A St Andrews player has been engaged as greenkeeper, and an improvement in the course, especially on the putting greens may be looked for ere long. Along with the committee he inspected the course on Saturday last, and made a number of suggestions as to how improvements could be carried out, and we understand that most of them have been adopted. The record of 36 strokes for the course still stands unbroken. Our local golf club should send two representatives to compete for the “ Evening Times” trophy.

The Buteman September 15th, 1906

Golf

 

On Saturday last the first handicap competition of the newly-formed Kyles Of Bute golf club took place for prizes presented by the Captain, Dr Wolfe and Vice Captain, Rev. J. Menzies. There was a fair turnout of members and although the day was not conducive to low scoring, there being a strong Westerly breeze, yet all those who returned their scoring cards showed that for young players of a new club, they had indeed made very good progress. Of course it should be mentioned here that the prize donors, who are also the two best players in the club, did not compete.

It was decided by the committee that once round the course of nine holes would be quite sufficient for the first match, especially under such weather conditions. After all the scoring card had been handed in it was found that Dr McDonald, Mr A. Barret, and Mr J. Gillies had tied with the fairly low score of 49 each. The deciding of the tie was both exciting and interesting, as on playing for the first hole Dr McDonald took a stroke more than his opponents, and so only secured the third prize. On playing out the next hole Mr Barret won the first prize by a stroke and Mr Gillies secured the second. At the finish of the competition the prizes were presented, and all those who took part were served with an excellent afternoon tea on the course, kindly given by Mrs Wolfe, assisted by a number of other ladies who were on the course. We hear that another competition is likely to take place shortly, open to all-comers, some prizes for which have already been given.

The Buteman September 15th, 1906

Concert

 

On Friday last a first class concert in aid of the Kyles Of Bute golf club was given in the public hall, Auchenlochan, which was completely filled. In opening the proceedings, Mr Walter F. Clark, of Glen Caladh, chairman, referred to the object of the concert, which was to help to raise the sum of £100, which was part of the sum they meant to spend during the coming winter in putting the course in thorough condition, especially the greens and with such a large audience there could be no question but that the funds would be greatly augmented. He also referred to the benefit the district would derive from having a golf course, and how pleased he was to hear that the course had been so much taken advantage of already. ( Applause )

The programme started with a brilliant pianoforte solo, “ sleigh bells,” by Miss Jane Duncan and Miss Turnbull. The Rev. W. King H. Macdonald sang with his usual vigor and with some effect his two items “ three for jack” and “ love could I only tell you” as on the programme, and, responding to encores, sung another two songs. Mrs Campbell Turnbull sang charmingly, and with good tatse, two songs “ Happy Song” and “ Swallows” singing as encores “ Spring” and “ Comin thro’ the rye.”

Miss Peggy Guthrie gave two violin solos, and it is no exaggeration to say that no better violinist ever appeared in this district, her playing being brilliant in the extreme. She was most happy in the piece she played as an encore, which represented the bagpipes.

Of course the star artistes of the evening were Mr Graham Moffat and Miss Kate Moffat, whose dramatic humerous, and scotch sketches were given with their usual ability and with excellent effect. Perhaps Mr Moffat’s recital of “ A fight with death” ( Maclaren ) was his best, the rendering of which was encored to the echo. This was Miss Moffat’s first appearance in the district and her next appearance will be looked forward to.

The concert was so successful that all the ladies and gentlemen who took part in the programme were most enthusiastically encored. At the close, the chairman proposed a vote of thanks to the performers who so kindly gave their services and in doing so wished to couple the names of Misses Turnbull, Rosebank, and the Misses Duncan, who took charge of the whole arrangements, which were carried out so successfully ( Applause )

Dr Wolfe then proposed a vote of thanks to the chairman, which was heartily responded to, the concert coming to an end by the singing of “ God Save The King.”

The Buteman September 29th, 1906

Golf Competitions

 

The golf club has fairly caught on in the district, and the devotees of the game have had another fine weeks enjoyment on the links at Kames. The ladies handicap did not come off last Saturday as expected, a preference being expressed for Friday afternoon this week. They have been practising most assiduously this week, and it is not easy to spot the probable winner, so many of the ladies are showing good form. Keen, close finishes are expected. A handicap competition for the sterner sex open to non members is to take place on Saturday next for some useful prizes, and a large entry has been obtained by Mr Secretary Barret. Some fine rounds have been done, but the record for the course of 36 strokes for the round, although some gallant attempts have been made on it, still remains unbroken, we understand.

The Buteman October 6th, 1906

Ladies Handicap Competition

 

The ladies entered heartily into the spirit of this competition and it turned out a complete success. The day was an ideal one for golf, just perhaps a degree or two to the warm side for the competitors. There was a large turnout of lady members and they really looked charming in their dainty dresses as they smote the little white ball skilfully from green to green. It was a most enjoyable competition, the ladies playing the game with much zest, and yet in friendly rivalry, the spirit of fair play being observed all through. Mr and Mrs Middleton, who were the donors of the handsome prizes, were interested spectators and it must have been gratifying to them to see such a splendid turnout. The prize winners were, Miss Ferguson, Otter House, Kilfinan, 1st Prize, and Miss L. Cowan, 2nd Prize, both of whom, especially the first prize winner, displayed fine form. Several of the competitors had hard lines in the hazards and bunkers, with which the course abounds, and a good many of the fair competitors came to grief at the burn and ditch which guards like a sentinel hole No 3. The gentlemen have a handicap competition today, and a large entry has been secured by the secretary, Mr Barret. This competition is open to all in the district – whether members or not – and a keen contest is expected, the competitors having had some grand practice games of late.

The Buteman October 13th, 1906

Golf

 

A general meeting of the Kyles Of Bute Golf Club was held last Friday evening in the schoolroom, there being a fair turn-out of members, the Rev. N.M. McFie in the chair. The principal business was the deciding of matters regarding the proposed bazaar. It was decided that a bazaar be held during the month of August next year, a number of ladies in the district and outside having promised to become stallholders. As the ladies of the club are most enthusiastic regarding the affair, everything points to the bazaar proving to be a success in every respect, under the guidance of their energetic secretary, Mr Barret. At the meeting it was also decided that from October on till May next residents may join at the reduced fee of 5s.

In last weeks notes we are sorry having omitted to state that the second prize ( a golf bag ) won by Miss L. Cowan of the Hollice, was kindly presented by the Misses Duncan of the Royal Hotel. Last Saturday a handicap competition for gentlemen was keenly contested and resulted in the first prize being won by Mr Neil Nicolson Jnr, Messrs H. Nicolson and A.M. Boyd handing in cards of the same score. This tie will be played off shortly. Today ( Saturday ) a mixed foursome match will be played over the course. Miss Turnbull kindly giving a prize for the lady of the winning pair.

The Buteman October 20th, 1906

 

A mixed foursome competition took place last Saturday. There was again a fine turnout, and from start to finish the scene was a bright and animated one. The weather was dry and a breeze, not too strong, from the North-West, had a frosty nip in it, just enough to have a bracing effect on the golfers, who buckled to their work with great zest and determination to win.

Some fine contests for supremacy took place between the various fours at the greens, which were a little heavy after the rain of the previous day or two. The fair golfers, who looked charming, excelled on the green. The prizewinners turned up in Miss Agnes Duncan and the Rev. J.M. Menzies, who played throughout a steady and at times brilliant game. They did the round in the creditable score of 65. Miss Potter and Mr Wilson Duncan took the second prize with 72. Mrs Wolfe and Mr N. Nicolson third with 75. Miss Cowan and Dr McDonald fourth with 76, and Miss L. Cowan and Mr T.R. Nicolson fifth with 77.

This, the first foursome held under the auspices of the club, was much enjoyed by the competitors, and they are, like Oliver Twist, asking for more, a request which we dare say will be granted in the near future.

It is expected that Messrs A. Boyd and H. Nicolson will play off their tie today. Should the weather prove kind, this should be a tie worth witnessing. Mr Boyd is in fine form at present, and though he has to concede 10 strokes on the round of 18 holes he is hopeful of reducing this leeway, more especially at the short holes, where his neat approaching and putting should stand him in good stead. Mr Nicolson excels at the long game, and not without hope of winning the tie, providing he can keep his drives straight.

Life in the village

Gowff Notes – By A beginner –

 

Man, man, it was a braw sicht the foursomes last Saturday. It wis worth gann six miles to see. Its really a gran’ gemm the gowff. It takes the bun, I think over awe the gems that played. It was delightful to view the ba fleein up in the air, like a wee white bird, efter a guid drive frae the tee, but whit must be the feelin o’ exhilaration  that suffuses the golfer that mak’s the drive. That’s whit I wid like tae ken. I’m prood, prood o’ the lassies, there rare cheery players, and sae smert lookin. They mak the course look twice as weel as when there only mere men buddies on’t. Gie’s mair fowersomes, I wad say tae the kommitte, Gie’s mair fowersomes, there just splendid.

The Buteman October 27th, 1906

Golf

 

Messrs Hugh Nicolson and Archd. Boyd played off their tie in favourable weather last Saturday. Mr Nicolson was below his usual standard. Mr Boyd, playing a sound, careful game, had the arrears wiped off in the first round when Mr Nicolson gracefully retired. Mr Boyd thus became the winner of the second prize – a beautiful golf club. The Glen Caladh players made amends for the defeat they sustained at the hands of the Kyles players about six weeks ago. In the return match, which was played at Glen Caladh, they won comfortably, Mr W. Duncan being the only Kyles player to score a victory over his opponent. The Glen Caladh players were in grand form, and evidently meant business.

 

Gowff Notes By A Beginner

 

Archie Boyd fairly cam’ oot his shell last Saturday in his tie, an’ he deserves a’ credit for his victory. We had a gran’ gemm oorsels, but we got bate. It’s a hantle easier to lose nor to win.

The Kyles golfers did no sae bad at Glen Caladh, though they got bate too. The Caladh players were quite brilliant, and mun hae been practesin gie hard sin’ the Kyles lads defeated them in the summer time – the good old summer time, I wish it wis back again.

Mr Watty Clark for Glen Caladh wis in quite Jamie Braid form. They tell me he led aff by takin the first three or fower holes in 3 strokes each, Braid himsel’ , I’m thinkin, couldna surpass – I question gin he could equal – that, fine gowffer an’ a’ as he is.

Hooever, the Glen Caladh lads were playing on their ane grund, and that maks a difference. When the Kyles boys got their links in good fettle and they come ower here tae play the advantage o’ grund, ’ll be on the Kyles side, and mebbe weel win the rubber. There nice chiells the Glen Caladh players, but they’ll be nane the waur o’ anither batin.

Theres a gran match to tak place on the links soon. I’m no gaun intae particklers the noo, I’m no shair o’ them masel’, an’ there’s a lot of kritics, but I’ll say this – it’ll be wan o’ the best and aboot the keenest gemm that’s been played yet. Look oot fur the particklers next week. There’s a lot o’ither things, but I hivnae time the noo.

The Buteman November 6th, 1906

Golf

 

The weather has been very unfortunate for golfing of late, and the devotees of the game have had to forego its delights and disappointments for a time.

The weather, however, seems to be taking up as we write, and we daresay the players will enter with added zest and increased enjoyment into the subtle, mysterious, and thrilling joys of the game. The links are now in process of improvement, and once this is completed we shall have a course to be proud of in every respect. A new green is being to No 1. This will add about forty yards to the distance from the teeing ground to the disc, and the approach to the green will be the most hazardous of any on the course, abounding in traps to catch the unwary traps that even an expert will find some difficulty to avoid falling into. It should be done by skilful play in four, but we shall not be surprised if double figures are takenat times and if sixes and eights are not uncommon.

The Buteman November 10th, 1906

 

The new greenkeeper is making his presence felt, and nearly half of the greens are already under process of improvement. They should be in fine trim by the springtime, and we may look for new records being put up then, as the game on the greens will be much left difficult, as they will be drier, smoother, and truer. We have had fine golfing weather this week back, and many have been taking advantage of this to get themselves in form for the coming match. North V South of the Kames march burn, which is to take place, we understand, provided the weather is kind, today. Both sides appear to be very evenly matched, and a keen contest is assured.

The Buteman November 17th, 1906

North V South Match

 

Ideal weather favoured this interesting match last Saturday, and there was a large turnout. The golfers had a most enjoyable afternoons recreation, though the competition was a very keen one, every inch of the way being stubbornly contested. The match was one of 18 holes, and 16 players took part.Mr B. Lyle had the distinction of holing out at No 7 green in 2 strokes, and Mr Menzies, who played very steadily throughout, had four 3s, and one of them “ McTavish” – a notable accomplishment. At the close, after an exciting finish it was found that the hardy Northmen has succumbed to the prowess of their Southern brethren by 2 matches. It is only fair to state, however, that Mr George Irvine, a good North player, figured on the South Side, and won a match for them. Had he lost, the competition would have ended in a draw of four matches each.

The Buteman December 8th, 1906

  

The North V South return game did not come off last Saturday either, but a number of the members had a very enjoyable afternoon, doing a round and a half of the course. Bertie Lyle did the round with A. Gemmell in 46 strokes, which is his lowest score and a very good one considering the state of the ground and that the course has been lengthened at holes 4 and 6. The latter has about 200 yards of heather from the tee for the golfer to negotiate with his drive, and then a deep burn guards the green at the next 200 yards about 30 yards from the green. He was over the burn with his third, and holed out in three more, a very good performance indeed, and one that will take some beating by the best at this time of the year. His partner took 5 to get out of the heather. We think the drive from this tee just a little bit too far. Not one golfer in ten will clear the heather, and there are some very bad lies, not to speak of the hazards, if one fails to clear the heather with his drive. A drive like this should not be given to the members of a club in its infancy. It would make an experienced golfer to screw his face. The caddies will have some fun with the visitors, we dare to say, at this one.

The Buteman December 29th, 1906

The Golf Club Bazaar

 

The circulars have now been issued for this bazaar, which will take place in the public hall, Auchenlochan, on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, 22nd, 23rd, and 24th August next. The object of the bazaar, as already reported, is to meet the expense of the new golf course, which so greatly enhances the attractions of the Scottish Torquay, and to erect a clubhouse. The sum of £800 is aimed at. A detailed list of the stallholders and recievers of work is given, and any further particulars can be had from Mr Aurthur Barret, M.A., hon secretary and treasurer.

The Buteman January 19th, 1907

Golf

 

The greens are now getting into shape and they will just be splendid. Mr Brown thinks that once he has our course completed it will be quite one of the finest in many respects for playing over to be found anywhere. With the lengthening days the golfers are beginning to hear the links a-calling, and are looking out their favourite clubs. Some enjoyable rounds are taking place already. A pair of players had a nice game on Saturday last, and a beginner did the round of nine holes over the extended course on Tuesday in 53 strokes, a fine score at this time of the year even for a seasoned player.

The Buteman February 2nd, 1907

Golf

 

Many of the golfers had to forego the pleasure of a round of the course on Saturday last for the first time this winter, though five or six enthusiasts managed, despite the many drawbacks to do the round. A snow shower followed them all the way. Much of their time was spent in looking for the wee white ball, rendered inconspicuous by the still whiter snow. The curious cantrips of the ball were rather amusing, however, to onlookers.

 

The Buteman February 23rd, 1907

Golf

 

A few enthusiasts still find pleasure in having a friendly encounter round the links of a Saturday afternoon, though the conditions are very much against low scoring, contesting every inch of the way through the green as keenly as if playing in the month of June. This should help them considerably we fancy, when the good weather which should be near at hand now, comes. The Drive across the heather to No 6 is still a source of anxiety and few accomplish this fine drive, but another player – a beginner too – did the trick a fortnight ago, clearing it with a few yards to spare. There will be keen competition directly to annex the record for the extended course, and he who gets round in 40 or 42 strokes will do well, and stand a good chance of holding it for a time at least, for the hazards are many and the way to Nos 4 and 6 is long.

 

The Buteman March 2nd, 1907

Good score by a beginner

 

A player, who has not been more than six months at the game did a round of the links on Saturday last of 51 strokes.

Mr Brown has started to lay the turf on the new greensand if this weather continues the turf will soon be knitted together by the rootlets of the young grass whose spear points are peeping through the ground already in sheltered places.

 

The Buteman March 9th, 1907

Golf

 

Another record was put up on Saturday. A beginner did the round in 48 strokes, which, taking everything into consideration, is remarkably good. Tempted by the pleasant afternoon, a large number did the round. After the rain on Friday however, the course was rather difficult in some places.

 

Buteman March 16th, 1907

Advert

 

Golf. – Clubs, Balls, Bags, everything required for the

Game can be had from Wm. Brown, Professional

At the clubhouse.

Prices to suit all.

Repairs neatly done, lessons given

Moderate charges – Kyles of bute golf club, Kames

3 minutes walk from the pier.

 

Four enthusiasts tried to do a round of the course on Saturday last, but after playing four holes, got caught, in the height of their enjoyment, in a snow storm, and had regretfully to desist owing to the difficulty of finding the wee white ball amid the sahara of still winter snow. Surely the weather will take up a little better now.

Buteman March 30th, 1907

Golf

 

The ideal weather conditions of last Saturday brought out the golfers, and a goodly number had a most enjoyable afternoons outing. Two members did no less than three rounds.The record of 48 strokes over the extended course, however, still stands to the credit of a beginner, though it came perilously near extinction, two scores of 49 almost doing the trick. It is sure to go one of these days should the good weather hold, for the course is improving daily. Who will be the first to lower it ?. That is the question.

 

Buteman April 6th, 1907

Golf

 

The golfers had a great afternoon’s enjoyment going round the links on Saturday last playing on the new greens for the first time. The grass has not grown much on them yet but they putted wonderfully well considering. A beginner went the full round of the new greens, over the extended course, and did it in the excellent score of 49, and this, notwithstanding he required 8 strokes to McTavish, which can be done now nicely in 4 or 5, allowing for getting trapped in the approach, which is rather difficult.

 

Buteman April 13th, 1907

Golf

 

The golfers are having a grand time now, and the scores show a great improvement. Beginners who found a difficulty in getting round in sixty are now getting round in 55, or 50 strokes, and are looking forward hopefully to getting among the forties. We had a couple of Glen Caladh players who did a round of the course last Saturday with two local members. They were highly pleased with the sporting nature of the course, which they think a fine one for testing a players skill, as any deviation from the correct line meets with dire punishment. The course was badly soaked after the rain of the Friday night and on Saturday morning, but one of them gave a fine display. He drove a ball from the teeing ground to the top left hand corner of the last green, a magnificent drive, and this was only one of many. He did not manage, however, to break the record for the course, which still stands at 48 strokes.

Buteman April 27th, 1907

 

Our New Golf Course, will, no doubt, prove a great attraction. Though rather a difficult one to master in the way of hazards, this is an additional attraction to the true golf enthusiast, who takes a pride in steering his way through these obstacles, for it is a test of skill to avoid them. Then the view is such a delightful one. The course ought certainly to become one of the most popular in Scotland once its many charms are known, for it is really a fascinating one. A round of these bracing links gives a bloom to the cheek and a sprkle to the eye that are worth coming a journey of 500 miles to obtain from ahealth point of view alone.

Buteman May 4th, 1907

 

The golf course is proving a grand addition to the attractions of the district, and some pleasant matches are taking place among the players of an evening now, and a number are in process of arrangement. A beginner who is shaping in good style did “ McTavish,” in two on Monday night. His drive lay within four inches of the pin. He had an excellent chance to put up new figures owing to this, but on 8 to No 9, ( he got into the burn ) which put him up to 50, two over the record.

Buteman June 8th, 1907

Golf

 

The opening of the new greens has been fixed for an early date, and we congratulate Mr Barret and his committee on having secured a first-class amateur golfer to give an exhibition game. He will probably do a round with our leading local player. In addition, we understand that the Captains of all the golf clubs on the Firth Of Clyde have received an invitation to be present at the opening ceremony, and the matches to follow should be of a high class and interesting nature. One will see the game at its best. These matches will be an education in golf, and many valuable wrinkles should be picked up by those anxious to become adept at the grand Royal and Ancient Game. This will give the Kyles of Bute course a splendid advertisement. The competitions for members begin next week. Members joining now are still eligible to compete.

Buteman June 15th, 1907

Golf

 

Hurry Up, We Want Our New Course !

 

The new greens will not be opened for play this week yet, but it is expected they will be on this day week. Mr Brown has been nursing them carefully, and once the members are allowed to play on them, there should be a vast improvement in their short game, for they are now covered with a fine coating of short grass which has taken on a very healthy looking shade of green, and they are looking nice and smooth. Some of the beginners, notwithstanding the unfavourable weather, are at practice every night. One of them did the round on two consecutive nights in 48, only 3 over fives which is a highly creditable performance and betoken not a little skill at the game.

We have a curious and laughable incident to record in connection with the play of three beginners, who played a round of the course together. While playing to No 3, beginner No 1 had a grand drive almost to the fence. Player No 2 got away a good one too, though not such a long one as the formers. Player No 3 topped his drive, and in endeavouring to make a good recovery he totally missed his second shot, which the roused his companion’s glee to a high pitch. Another half topped cleek shot followed, but the ball hopped along fairly well.

Still, he barely lay in three where his gleeful mated lay in one, and they unmercifully chaffed him as he addressed his ball for his fourth. Getting the ball nicely this time with his mashie, he lofted it over the fence, within five yards of the pin, and, lo! It ran up, went round the pin, and tumbled into the hole.

Player No 3 now executed a war dance that would have done credit to a red indian, while he brandished his mashie round his head like a shillelagh. It was a complete turning of the tables on his now chagrined companions, who took an approach and three putts to hole out, and the crestfallen ones had no retort ready to the “ never halloo till your out of the wood,” of their elated companion.

Scotsman July 2nd, 1907

 

Golf on the Kyles Of Bute

 

The most recent addition to the golf courses in the West of Scotland is that opened the other day on the high ground to the West of Tignabruaich, by Lieutenant – Colonel McLaren, St Andrews. For a year men have been employed in draining and laying out the links under the expert advice of William Brown of St Andrews. Though much yet remains to be done, especially in the way of minimising undeserved penalties, the course is one of which any district may be proud. It is too soon to speak of the “ Greens,” but considering that the turf was only laid in the early spring of this year, their condition reflects credit on the greenkeeper. No artificial bunkers were needed, the natural hazards being sufficiently varied and difficult to demand the golfer’s best efforts. The course is a mile and a half in extent, and the length of the holes varies from 201 yards to 451 yards. The scenery from “ Spion Kop” – the fourth hole, is superb, charming views being obtained of the high hills towards Kilfinan, of Ascog Loch, Ascog Castle, Loch Fyne, Tarbert, and Kyles Of Bute ; while the views of the Kyles Of Bute and the narrows from the seventh hole can hardly be surpassed anywhere. For the purpose of providing a fund to meet current expenses and erect a club-house, a bazaar will be held in the public hall, Auchenlochan, next month.

Buteman July 6th, 1907

Golf

 

The competitions are now on, and some keen but most enjoyable contests have taken place. In the ladies competition the best scores were those of Misses A. Duncan ( 20 ) 78 ; M. Cowan ( 35 ) 88 ; J. Duncan ( 23 ) 92 ; and J. Paton ( 33 ) 98.

The gentlemen’s first competition for the monthly medal, presented by Mr Macdonald, resulted :- A. Gemmell ( 18 ) 81 ; J. Paterson ( 30 ) 85 ; A. Boyd ( 20 ) 87 ; J. McNeil ( 20 ) 98 ; J.M. Menzies ( scratch ) 91 ; N. Nicolson ( 15 ) 91.

The ladies played a good game considering the poor weather it has been for them for practice games. Miss Duncan especially playing a fine all-round game. For the gentlemen, the outstanding feature in the play of the winner was his excellent putting with a new club, supplied by Mr W. Brown, the local professional and with which he had not putted before. Owing principally to this he did holes No 1 and 3 in 3 strokes each, getting home putts of 10 feet on both greens. The President’s competition takes place on an early date, and members who wish to take part should adhibit their names to the sheet left in the clubhouse for this purpose.

Buteman July 13th, 1907

Golf

 

The visitors are thoroughly enjoying themselves on the golf course, which they consider, though difficult, a good course, providing a right good test of the game. The views from Nos 4,7, and 8 are greatly admired. The golf competitions are proceeding merrily apace, the one for the President’s handsome cup and the league foursome being both under way. The first round of the former must be finished by Saturday next, and the second monthly competition for the beautiful gold medal presented by Dr Macdonald takes place the following week.

 

Buteman July 20th, 1907

The Golf Course

 

The golf-links are being well patronised, and the President’s cup competition will be concluded this week. The ties so far have resulted – J. McNeill ( 20 ) V A. Gemmell ( 14 ). The former won by 4 and 3 to play. A. Boyd ( 14 ) V J. Turner ( 25 ). The latter won by 6 and 5 to play. J. Benn ( 20 ) V D. McNeill ( 25 ) The former won by 3 and 2 to play. The committee are anxious to have the foursomes well under way this week. Any couple can play any other pair at any time. There are no draws needed in this competition ; each pair has to play every other pair once, and it is immaterial which one is played first or last. There are 9 pairs so that each pair will have to 8 matches. A match could be played every night of the week at present say from 7 to 9.30pm, but as the days are shortening this will not be possible in 8 or 10 days from now.

The Buteman July 27th, 1907

Golf

 

The golf competitions have been advanced a stage since last week. Results up to the time of writing for President’s cup :-  J. Paterson ( 25 ) beat C. Campbell ( 30 ) by 2 and 2 to play ; A. Barret ( 25 ) beat J. Gillies ( 30 ) by 3 and 2 ; G. Irvine ( 14 ) beat B. Lyle ( 10 ) by 3 ; Dr McDonald ( 14 ) beat J. McFarlane by 4 and 2 ; A. McGilp ( 25 ) beat J.M. Menzies ( Scratch ) by 2 and 1, after two ties ; J. Lyle ( 15 ) walk over, N. Nicolson scratched.

The visitors think the links excellent, and a fine test of golf, even for the most expert of golfer – there are so many natural traps and hazards. They have made many gallant attempts on the record held by Mr Menzies of 40 strokes for the nine holes, but no one has succeeded in breaking it, though one came near to it with a creditable score of 41 strokes over the round, which represents good play.

The Buteman June 22nd 1907

Golf

 

This will be a Red-Letter day in the history of the Kyles Of Bute Golf Club, Col. McLaren of the Chalet, a fine player himself, has kindly consented to formally open the new greens, which Mr Brown, the greenkeeper, has running well and true, and Miss Ferguson, Otter House, who won the beautiful rose-bowl presented by Mr Middleton last season, will drive off the first ball. Thereafter, the captain of the Kyles club, two captains of other clubs on the West Coast, and our local professional and two other professionals, Messrs J. Adams, Glasgow, and D. Bremner, Rothesay, who holds the record for the Rothesay course, will give exhibition games, which should prove of much interest to those desirous of seeing how this fascinating game can be played.

Beginners should study the game closely, as in this way they may pick up a valuable wrinkle or two, for golf is a game of great skill and delicacy of touch, and this would stand them in good stead in the competitions which are to begin next week. We hope the weather will be kind, which is all that is needed now to make the function a great success. Many new members have joined this season, and this should be the means of adding still more to the roll, besides giving the course a grand advertisement.

The Buteman June 27th, 1907

Golfing

 

To-day ( Saturday ) the Kyles Of Bute golf course is to be opened at 2 o’clock by Lieut. Col. McLaren, of St Andrews, and the chalet here. After the opening ceremony, a match is to take place over the new course by some prominent professionals and amateurs, including Mr David Adams, of Glasgow, Mr Harry Stuart, of Rhubodach, Rev. J. Menzies, and Mr Wm. Brown, the local professional. This should prove an attraction to others as well as to the members.

The course is well situated above the sea level, and a magnificent view of the Kyles, and even Loch Fyne, can be had from some of the greens. There are nine holes, and the whole course is now in excellent condition, no effort or expense having been spared to make the course a first class one, and it should be the means of attracting both golfers and visitors to the district.

The Buteman June 29th, 1907

 

Opening of The Kyles Of Bute

Golf Course

 

Last Saturday afternoon the nine-hole golf course, laid out by D. Adams, Glasgow,on the high ground ( Averaging 750 feet above sea level ) to the West of Tighnabruaich, was formally opened by Lieut. Colonel McLaren, St Andrews, and the Chalet, Tighnabruaich, in the presence of a large and representative gathering.

Several telegrams were received, one from Miss Turnbull, the captain of the ladies section, who, unavoidably absent, sent her hearty good wishes for the success of the club. Flags and bunting were lavishly displayed, and, though a heavy shower of rain fell in the forenoon, the day’s proceedings passed off in perhaps the finest golfing weather experienced here for over a month.

A contingent of scratch golfers from Glasgow and Rothesay arrived by the morning steamer and were hospitably entertained along with a few of the club’s officials at luncheon by Aurthur Hervey Esq, Elmbank. The Vice President, Rev. N.M. Macfie, proposed the host and hostess, which was heartily responded to.

On the arrival of the party on the course, Colonel Jamieson, President of the club, introduced Colonel McLaren, who in a short and felicitous speech, thanked the committee for the honour they had conferred on him. He expressed his conviction that a more beautiful spot could not have been chosen for a golf course than Tighnabruaich. Time and money, he said were required to make a course. St Andrews spent £1,000 per annum, and kept 12 men constantly employed. He hoped that the club would retain the hearty support of the people of the district, and though a bazaar was, no doubt, a necessity, it was a mere flash in the pan. He laid great stress on the replacing of the divots, and expressed the hope that the Kyles club would not be troubled by that species of golfer, who spoiled the links both for himself and others. He thought it was a good thing, under the circumstances, that ladies were eligible for membership, and that the club had debarred golf on Sunday, for as Old Tom Morris used to say, “ if the player doesn’t require a rest, the links do.” Concluding, the Colonel asked the Rev. J.M. Menzies, captain of the club, to drive off the first ball, which being done in his customary easy style , the Colonel declared the course open.

After Mr Menzies has suitably replied on behalf of the club, three hearty cheers were given for the Colonel and his lady.

A four-ball foursome was then played by J. Adams, Glasgow, and J.M. Menzies Versus  D. Bremner, Rothesay, ( Professional ) and W. Park, Glenburn, Rothesay. The match was followed with great interest by a large crowd, and proved to be a keenly contested one, as no fewer than 10 holes were halved.

At the 17th green the home representatives were dormy one. Excitement ran high. For Bremner, having everything to gain and nothing to lose, hazarded too much, and slicing badly into the rough, lost his ball. His partner failed to secure bogey for a half. Adams and Menzies holed out in 4, and thus won by 2 up. Colonel McLaren gave a prize to the winning couple.

It has often been remarked, and is still believed in by some, that the Kyles Of Bute requires no adventitious aids to enhance its attractions, that its world-famed scenery of hills and highland lochs, and its fishing, boating, and yachting facilities are sufficient to ensure  for it a wide and lasting popularity. But that as it may, it was felt by a few golfing enthusiasts that the ubiquitous golfer ( whether or not endowed with the eye for scenic effects ) was a force to be reckoned with in these days.

For a year men have been employed draining and laying out the course under the expert advice of Wm. Brown, St Andrews.

Though much remains to be done, especially in the way of minimising undeserved penalties, the course is one of which any district may be proud. It is too soon to speak of the “ greens,”  but considering that the turf was only laid in early spring this year, their condition reflects credit on the greenkeeper. No artificial bunkers were needed, the natural hazards being sufficiently difficult to demand the golfers best efforts.

The course is a mile and a half in extent, and the length of the holes varies from 201 to 451 yards.

The first hole ( 224 yards ) has a gentle rise, which hides from view the tricky hazard guarding the hole. A badly sliced ball is sure to go out of bounds. A good drive and a careful approach over a bunker of rocks, heather and long grass, should give a bogey 4 or a par 3.

In front of the second tee is a hazard of gorse, heather, ditch and fence, extending a distance of fully 100 yards, the exacting nature of which makes it trying to a timid player. A good drive and brassy shot are required to reach the green, though the hanging lies and the rough spongy soil of the direct line make an additional mashy shot more frequently necessary.

The third is a blind hole, and is uphill. A straight drive and well played approach over a natural hazard of bog, grass, and ditch ought to make a bogey 4, or perfect 3, while the ambitious driver suffers from his temerity by requiring to use his niblick or mashy, from an almost unplayable position in the ditch.

The fourth ( Spion Kop ) is certainly the most trying on the course, being 420 yards in length, and of steep incline. Good lies are obtained if the first trap is avoided, a terrace about 150 yards from the tee, for which from bog, grass, and peaty soil, an iron is oftener necessary than a brassy. The scenery from Spion Kop is superb, charming views being obtained of the high hills towards Kilfinan, of Ascog Loch, Ascog Castle, Loch Fyne, Tarbert, and Kyles Of Bute.

Hole 5 runs parallel to the preceding, but is downhill, and is deservedly a favourite. A foozled rive gets a hanging lie among long grass and spongy soil. A formidable ditch and rough ground capture all sliced balls. Careful judgement has to be exercised in the approach, for too strong a pitch lands the ball beyond the green among gorse and heather, and then farewell bogey 4.

The sixth is the longest ( 451 yards ) and is by some considered the most difficult. A hazard of heather, ditches and drains extends at least 200 yards in front. Safety is only possible to the long driver. Luck, however, is a valuable ally to the unskilful, for it often happens that a foozled ball is teed on heather, but oftener, of course, in a position that calls forth a mild expletive. Great care has to be taken with the approach, for a burn and rough ground guard the plateau on which the green has been hollowed out.

In driving to the seventh a sliced ball must be avoided, the ground to the right being broken up with drains, ditches, and stunted trees. The second half of this hole has a sharp descent, the green being built on a ledge overhanging a steep dell or ravine, and unfortunate indeed is the player who makes too strong an approach or gets off the direct line. The views of the Kyles Of Bute and the narrows from this green can hardly be surpassed.

The eighth hole, which is uphill, and runs parallel to the seventh, offers no difficulties to the careful player, if we except the boulders in front of the steep rocky ground to the right. The “ Tee,” for the home green is on the summit of “ Choc a Chullin,” from which there is a magnificent view of the Kyles Of Bute and Inchmarnock. As the hole is the shortest ( 201 yards ) a good drive lands home. However, if  “ Far and Sure,” cannot be relied on, the cautious game pays best, for a formidable burn 160 yards distant, bars the way to the green.

Possesing such numerous and varied attractions, Tighnabruaich is an ideal place for a holiday. The course is only a quarter of a mile distant from Kames and Auchenlochan Piers, and excellent hotel and house accommodationcan be had in Tighnabruaich, Auchenlochan, and Kames.

For the purpose of providing a fund to meet current expenses, and to erect a club-house, a bazaar will be held in the public hall, Auchenlochan, on 22nd, 23rd, and 24th August this year.

Buteman August 3rd, 1907

Kyles Of Bute Golf Club Competitions

 

The Rev. J.M. Menzies ( Scratch ) by grand all round play won the handsome McDonald monthly medal with the fine score of 79 – 39 for the first round of nine holes and 40 the second. This a record for the course of 18 holes, and beats his own record of 40 by one stroke for the nine holes. The next best scores were J. Turner ( 25 ) 81 ; A. McGilp ( 25 ) 85 ; J. Paterson ( 25 ) 86 ; A. Barret ( 25 ) 88 ; B. Lyle ( 10 ) 89 ; J. McNeill ( 20 ) 89 ; J. Benn ( 20 ) 90 ; D. McNeill ( 20 ) 90 ; J. Benn and A. McGilp had a tie in the second round of the President’s cup. In the league foursome championship J. Benn ( 17 ) and J. Turner ( 18 ) won full points by 3 and 2 to play off J.M. Menzies ( Scratch ) and D. McNeill ( 25 ) ; J. Irvine ( 15 ) and J. Gillies ( 30 ) won the points by 7 and 6 off J. Paterson ( 25 ) and C. Campbell ( 30 ) and by 3 and 1 off Dr McDonald ( 15 ) and A. Gemmell ( 14 ) ; A.M. Boyd ( 14 ) and A. McGilp ( 20 ) were 1 down and 4 to play to N. Nicolson ( 14 ) and J. Lyle ( 15 ) when the match had to be postponed owing to the failing light.

A bogey competition is now under way for a prize of three 2s golf balls presented by the Rev. J.M. Menzies, the captain of the club. The entry money is 3d a try, and competitors can have as many tries against the “ colonel,” as they choose. The proceeds are to go to the funds of the bazaar which is to be held at the end of this monthin aid of the club. This should prove a popular competition and a fine test of skill, for the colonel’s score is one that does not allow of many foozles. A round against the colonel is always a source of interest, and is greatly enjoyed by the player who is pitted against him, more especially if he can beat him, though this is a feat not easily accomplished for the wily old veteran has always proved himself to be a hard nut to crack. The second round for the President’s cup must be finished to-day. ( Saturday ).

Scotsman August 24th, 1910

Kyles Of Bute Golf Club

 

New Clubhouse Opened

 

The new clubhouse for the Kyles Of Bute Golf Club has been formally opened. Mr F.W.F. Clark of Glencaladh Castle, who performed the ceremony, referred to the magnificence of the site on which the clubhouse is built. He also reviewed the progress of the club since its inception in 1906, and in this connection paid a high tribute to Mr Aurthur Barrett, hon. Secretary of the club, to whose untiring efforts the present sound and prosperous condition of the club was in a large measure due. A similar compliment was paid to Dr MacDonald, Captain of the club. Dr MacDonald in the name of the members presented Mr Clark with a silver tobacco box as a souvenir of the occasion.

The Buteman May 23rd, 1934

Kames

 

Kyles Of Bute Golf Club

 

Annual Contest at Machrihanish

 

The annual contest for the Glen Caladh Cup took place on Monday last. As Rhubodach golf course is no longer available this match this year was held at Machrihanish owing to the generosity of Mr F.W. Fell Clark, who placed his yacht the “ Sea Hawk,” at the disposal of the players. A high wind made the voyage rather unpleasant, and in place of going to Campbeltown direct as originally intended, the yacht was moored at Tarbert, where the party proceeded to Machrahanish by motor charabanc. After luncheon had been served, the President, Mr Clark, and the Vice President, Rev. J.A. Somerville, had a friendly game on the links, while the two teams contended in a strenuous game. Victory rested with Glen Caladh on this occasion by 4 ¾  points to 2. The following are the individual scores :-

       

 

 

T. Strangman ………. 0                  Ian Irvine ……………..  1

Alan Chambers …….. 1 ¼             J. Paterson …………….  0

R. Davies ………….   0                 D. Nicholson  …………  1

Mrs V.C. Davies   ….  1 ¾             A. Shaw ………………. 0

A. MacMurry ………. 1                 J.M. McKellar  ……….  0

Frank Clark  ………..  1 ¼             C. McKellar  …………   0

 

One point was counted for the match and a quarter for the bye.

 

In handing over the cup at Auchenlochan Pier, on the return journey, Rev. J.A. Somerville said that the Glen Caladh match was associated with the memory of old stalwarts and hard-fought battles in olden days. They were greatly indebted to Mr F.W. Fell Clark for the magnificent outing he had given them that day.

In accepting custody of the cup for the ensuing year, Mr Clark expressed his pleasure that it had returned to his keeping, and hoped that the battle for its possession would long continue and that the better team would always win.

With three hearty cheers for their opponents, the teams then parted with every expression of good-will on either side.

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